One Vote Melbourne City Councillor Peter Clarke misses chance to sit in Spring Street by one Vote

Melbourne City Councillor peter Clarke has missed by one vote his chance of seeking preselection for Warrandyte. Peter Clarke who lives in Eltham and is also a Melbourne City Councillor lost after the Liberal Party split 50/50 on two sucessive ballots. It was only after the thidd ballot than one vote changed camps and broke the deadlock. Regretfully Peter Clarke was on teh loosiong end and so was Ted Bailue.

Analysis of the Melbourne City Council 2004 Municipal election indicate that had Peter Clarke resigned form the City Council to take up the fight for Spring Street, yours truely would have been elected to the City Council on a countback. This would have had the administration in a hot sweat. The Council administration has previously gone to extra-ordinary efforts to avoid the election os those critical of Council administration and the extent of corruption never ceases to amaze or surrprise. (They are corrupt in this respect make no doubt about that). I wonder if this could have been a factor in Peters down fall and if teh City Council acted against Peter’s interests.

Had the fall of preferences been somewhat different Peter would have missed out on being elected in 2004, but the fact remains he is one of the more better perfomers on the City Council. Maybe he should consider running for the seat of Eltham, a harder seat but one that is close to Peter’s home.

One Vote Melbourne City Councillor Peter Clarke misses chance to sit in Spring Street by one Vote

Melbourne City Councillor peter Clarke has missed by one vote his chance of seeking preselection for Warrandyte. Peter Clarke who lives in Eltham and is also a Melbourne City Councillor lost after the Liberal Party split 50/50 on two sucessive ballots. It was only after the thidd ballot than one vote changed camps and broke the deadlock. Regretfully Peter Clarke was on teh loosiong end and so was Ted Bailue.

Analysis of the Melbourne City Council 2004 Municipal election indicate that had Peter Clarke resigned form the City Council to take up the fight for Spring Street, yours truely would have been elected to the City Council on a countback. This would have had the administration in a hot sweat. The Council administration has previously gone to extra-ordinary efforts to avoid the election os those critical of Council administration and the extent of corruption never ceases to amaze or surrprise. (They are corrupt in this respect make no doubt about that). I wonder if this could have been a factor in Peters down fall and if teh City Council acted against Peter’s interests.

Had the fall of preferences been somewhat different Peter would have missed out on being elected in 2004, but the fact remains he is one of the more better perfomers on the City Council. Maybe he should consider running for the seat of Eltham, a harder seat but one that is close to Peter’s home.

One Vote Melbourne City Councillor Peter Clarke misses chance to sit in Spring Street by one Vote

Melbourne City Councillor peter Clarke has missed by one vote his chance of seeking preselection for Warrandyte. Peter Clarke who lives in Eltham and is also a Melbourne City Councillor lost after the Liberal Party split 50/50 on two sucessive ballots. It was only after the thidd ballot than one vote changed camps and broke the deadlock. Regretfully Peter Clarke was on teh loosiong end and so was Ted Bailue.

Analysis of the Melbourne City Council 2004 Municipal election indicate that had Peter Clarke resigned form the City Council to take up the fight for Spring Street, yours truely would have been elected to the City Council on a countback. This would have had the administration in a hot sweat. The Council administration has previously gone to extra-ordinary efforts to avoid the election os those critical of Council administration and the extent of corruption never ceases to amaze or surrprise. (They are corrupt in this respect make no doubt about that). I wonder if this could have been a factor in Peters down fall and if teh City Council acted against Peter’s interests.

Had the fall of preferences been somewhat different Peter would have missed out on being elected in 2004, but the fact remains he is one of the more better perfomers on the City Council. Maybe he should consider running for the seat of Eltham, a harder seat but one that is close to Peter’s home.

John Vogel’s, State opposition spokesperson for Local Government, comments advocating a “first-past-the-post” voting system (Herald Sun Nov 28) demonstrates his inability to understand the mechanics and principles of Australia’s democratic elections.

Link to original article in the Herald-Sun

First-past-the-post elections are not the solution to the perceived problem of “dummy” candidates, they will always exist, genuine or not.

At least with a preferential ballot voters are given a choice to determine who they elect to represent them with the assurance that a candidate must receive and absolute majority (50% + 1) of voters support

Under a first-past-the-post election a candidate can be elected with less then 35% of the vote, as was the case with George Bush’s election in 2000, the only requirement being that they have the highest minoity number of votes as opposed to a majority.

Give me a majority elected candidate over a minority supported candidate any day.

Democracy is not perfect but it is the best system we have.

Australia should stand proud of its preferential voting system and not pander to the ill informed.

Other Countries such as England, The United States Canada and Ukraine would be better off if they adopted our preferential voting system.

John Vogel’s, State opposition spokesperson for Local Government, comments advocating a “first-past-the-post” voting system (Herald Sun Nov 28) demonstrates his inability to understand the mechanics and principles of Australia’s democratic elections.

Link to original article in the Herald-Sun

First-past-the-post elections are not the solution to the perceived problem of “dummy” candidates, they will always exist, genuine or not.

At least with a preferential ballot voters are given a choice to determine who they elect to represent them with the assurance that a candidate must receive and absolute majority (50% + 1) of voters support

Under a first-past-the-post election a candidate can be elected with less then 35% of the vote, as was the case with George Bush’s election in 2000, the only requirement being that they have the highest minoity number of votes as opposed to a majority.

Give me a majority elected candidate over a minority supported candidate any day.

Democracy is not perfect but it is the best system we have.

Australia should stand proud of its preferential voting system and not pander to the ill informed.

Other Countries such as England, The United States Canada and Ukraine would be better off if they adopted our preferential voting system.

John Vogel’s, State opposition spokesperson for Local Government, comments advocating a “first-past-the-post” voting system (Herald Sun Nov 28) demonstrates his inability to understand the mechanics and principles of Australia’s democratic elections.

Link to original article in the Herald-Sun

First-past-the-post elections are not the solution to the perceived problem of “dummy” candidates, they will always exist, genuine or not.

At least with a preferential ballot voters are given a choice to determine who they elect to represent them with the assurance that a candidate must receive and absolute majority (50% + 1) of voters support

Under a first-past-the-post election a candidate can be elected with less then 35% of the vote, as was the case with George Bush’s election in 2000, the only requirement being that they have the highest minoity number of votes as opposed to a majority.

Give me a majority elected candidate over a minority supported candidate any day.

Democracy is not perfect but it is the best system we have.

Australia should stand proud of its preferential voting system and not pander to the ill informed.

Other Countries such as England, The United States Canada and Ukraine would be better off if they adopted our preferential voting system.