Shorten: Survey of one confirms what we know is true

Assistant Treasure Bill Shorten in his survey of one has conformed what we all know to be true. Retail and service providers have failed to pass on the win fall of Australia’s high dollar to consumers. Prices of goods and services have not come down down down as the cost of purchase and profits from overseas services become cheaper.

A decade ago when the Australian dollar was low in value businesses were quick to pass on the costs of petrol and overseas manufactured goods to the public. Petrol broke though the one dollar a liter barrier and the costs of goods increased in compassion to the the Australian Dollar. Overseas travel became that much more expensive as the Australian dollar had to work twice as hard.

Today the opposite is the case. The Australian Dollar is twice as much in value yet the prices of goods and services has not gone down. Petrol remains high.

The extent of profit taking and opportunism is shown clearly in the English Language testing system. The cost of sitting an IELTS test in Australia is twice that of charged in the United States, UK and Ireland. The profits being paid to the the overseas licencing coping Seek Learning have doubled in value at Australia’s expense. Instead of going up $20 from $310 to $330 the costs of sitting the IELTS test should have gone down.

It is this pocketing of the win fall and the failure to pass on some of the benefits of having a high dollar that has contributed to the decline in retail in Australia. With an in crease in the value of the dollar the cost of buying on line overseas sourced goods and shipping them to Australia has become much much more competitive and consumers are voting with their keyboards boycotting Australian retail outlets.

Add to that the cost of rent in shopping centers or the cost of parking within the City of Melbourne and extended hours parking restrictions apply and the landlords and City Council are also contributing to the economic inflationary pressure impacting retail in Melbourne. Instead of passing on the benefits oif a high dollar small retail outlets have the opportunity to use the win fall profits to off set other high costs associated with running a business in the city. Sure the City Council has discouraged shopping in the CBD. The CBD is no longer the place to shop. Services can be sourced on line and the consumer has to some extent greater choices. But this only applies where there is real competition but in prices and services offered.

organisations like Seek learning’s IELTS have a legislative monopoly. Even though the Department of Immigration and Citizenship have began to recognise other accredited service providers the Skills assessment authorities such as the CPA and others continue to only acept IETLS as the only means of assessing English language requirements. If level of English is the aim of the skills assessment then why are they only prepared to accept IELTS as the only means of assessment. If alternative language assessments are available and accredited then why are not not being recognise.

Bill Shorten like that of many in Australia know all too well the price ripp offs we see day to day.

It is only by exposing the profit takers and subjecting them to real competition that the benefits of a high dollar will be passed on to residents.

Shorten: Survey of one confirms what we know is true

Assistant Treasure Bill Shorten in his survey of one has conformed what we all know to be true. Retail and service providers have failed to pass on the win fall of Australia’s high dollar to consumers. Prices of goods and services have not come down down down as the cost of purchase and profits from overseas services become cheaper.

A decade ago when the Australian dollar was low in value businesses were quick to pass on the costs of petrol and overseas manufactured goods to the public. Petrol broke though the one dollar a liter barrier and the costs of goods increased in compassion to the the Australian Dollar. Overseas travel became that much more expensive as the Australian dollar had to work twice as hard.

Today the opposite is the case. The Australian Dollar is twice as much in value yet the prices of goods and services has not gone down. Petrol remains high.

The extent of profit taking and opportunism is shown clearly in the English Language testing system. The cost of sitting an IELTS test in Australia is twice that of charged in the United States, UK and Ireland. The profits being paid to the the overseas licencing coping Seek Learning have doubled in value at Australia’s expense. Instead of going up $20 from $310 to $330 the costs of sitting the IELTS test should have gone down.

It is this pocketing of the win fall and the failure to pass on some of the benefits of having a high dollar that has contributed to the decline in retail in Australia. With an in crease in the value of the dollar the cost of buying on line overseas sourced goods and shipping them to Australia has become much much more competitive and consumers are voting with their keyboards boycotting Australian retail outlets.

Add to that the cost of rent in shopping centers or the cost of parking within the City of Melbourne and extended hours parking restrictions apply and the landlords and City Council are also contributing to the economic inflationary pressure impacting retail in Melbourne. Instead of passing on the benefits oif a high dollar small retail outlets have the opportunity to use the win fall profits to off set other high costs associated with running a business in the city. Sure the City Council has discouraged shopping in the CBD. The CBD is no longer the place to shop. Services can be sourced on line and the consumer has to some extent greater choices. But this only applies where there is real competition but in prices and services offered.

organisations like Seek learning’s IELTS have a legislative monopoly. Even though the Department of Immigration and Citizenship have began to recognise other accredited service providers the Skills assessment authorities such as the CPA and others continue to only acept IETLS as the only means of assessing English language requirements. If level of English is the aim of the skills assessment then why are they only prepared to accept IELTS as the only means of assessment. If alternative language assessments are available and accredited then why are not not being recognise.

Bill Shorten like that of many in Australia know all too well the price ripp offs we see day to day.

It is only by exposing the profit takers and subjecting them to real competition that the benefits of a high dollar will be passed on to residents.

Shorten: Survey of one confirms what we know is true

Assistant Treasure Bill Shorten in his survey of one has conformed what we all know to be true. Retail and service providers have failed to pass on the win fall of Australia’s high dollar to consumers. Prices of goods and services have not come down down down as the cost of purchase and profits from overseas services become cheaper.

A decade ago when the Australian dollar was low in value businesses were quick to pass on the costs of petrol and overseas manufactured goods to the public. Petrol broke though the one dollar a liter barrier and the costs of goods increased in compassion to the the Australian Dollar. Overseas travel became that much more expensive as the Australian dollar had to work twice as hard.

Today the opposite is the case. The Australian Dollar is twice as much in value yet the prices of goods and services has not gone down. Petrol remains high.

The extent of profit taking and opportunism is shown clearly in the English Language testing system. The cost of sitting an IELTS test in Australia is twice that of charged in the United States, UK and Ireland. The profits being paid to the the overseas licencing coping Seek Learning have doubled in value at Australia’s expense. Instead of going up $20 from $310 to $330 the costs of sitting the IELTS test should have gone down.

It is this pocketing of the win fall and the failure to pass on some of the benefits of having a high dollar that has contributed to the decline in retail in Australia. With an in crease in the value of the dollar the cost of buying on line overseas sourced goods and shipping them to Australia has become much much more competitive and consumers are voting with their keyboards boycotting Australian retail outlets.

Add to that the cost of rent in shopping centers or the cost of parking within the City of Melbourne and extended hours parking restrictions apply and the landlords and City Council are also contributing to the economic inflationary pressure impacting retail in Melbourne. Instead of passing on the benefits oif a high dollar small retail outlets have the opportunity to use the win fall profits to off set other high costs associated with running a business in the city. Sure the City Council has discouraged shopping in the CBD. The CBD is no longer the place to shop. Services can be sourced on line and the consumer has to some extent greater choices. But this only applies where there is real competition but in prices and services offered.

organisations like Seek learning’s IELTS have a legislative monopoly. Even though the Department of Immigration and Citizenship have began to recognise other accredited service providers the Skills assessment authorities such as the CPA and others continue to only acept IETLS as the only means of assessing English language requirements. If level of English is the aim of the skills assessment then why are they only prepared to accept IELTS as the only means of assessment. If alternative language assessments are available and accredited then why are not not being recognise.

Bill Shorten like that of many in Australia know all too well the price ripp offs we see day to day.

It is only by exposing the profit takers and subjecting them to real competition that the benefits of a high dollar will be passed on to residents.

Grab for cash: City Council suck the life blood from Melbourne nightlife

Melbourne City Council has opted for the cash and in doing so is sucking out the life blood from late night city traders. Lord Mayor Robert Doyle in announcing that City Commuters will be forced to pay for late night on-street parking tried to claim that the additional 2 million dollars that is expected to be generated will be used to pay for Melbourne’s Trees. I guess he could suggest that money will pay for Hospital care or some other emotional cause in need of funding to justify the cash grab.

The benefit is that the Council will need to ensure that Grey ghost Traffic offers are available to enforce the on street parking fees, but this comes at a further cost and risk to officer security. Many car parking spaces are in low security poor lighting areas.

The fees certainly do nothing to assist Melbourne’s declining retail trade sector with more and more businesses leaving the CDB for the suburban shopping center.

In the meantime Melbourne’s bonus congestion Tax is still being spent on non commuter projects such as the free tourist bus. The City Council would be better off freeing up night time and weekend parking and providing a commuter bus service connecting South Yarra with East Melbourne Carlton, Parkville and North Melbourne communities.

Grab for cash: City Council suck the life blood from Melbourne nightlife

Melbourne City Council has opted for the cash and in doing so is sucking out the life blood from late night city traders. Lord Mayor Robert Doyle in announcing that City Commuters will be forced to pay for late night on-street parking tried to claim that the additional 2 million dollars that is expected to be generated will be used to pay for Melbourne’s Trees. I guess he could suggest that money will pay for Hospital care or some other emotional cause in need of funding to justify the cash grab.

The benefit is that the Council will need to ensure that Grey ghost Traffic offers are available to enforce the on street parking fees, but this comes at a further cost and risk to officer security. Many car parking spaces are in low security poor lighting areas.

The fees certainly do nothing to assist Melbourne’s declining retail trade sector with more and more businesses leaving the CDB for the suburban shopping center.

In the meantime Melbourne’s bonus congestion Tax is still being spent on non commuter projects such as the free tourist bus. The City Council would be better off freeing up night time and weekend parking and providing a commuter bus service connecting South Yarra with East Melbourne Carlton, Parkville and North Melbourne communities.

Grab for cash: City Council suck the life blood from Melbourne nightlife

Melbourne City Council has opted for the cash and in doing so is sucking out the life blood from late night city traders. Lord Mayor Robert Doyle in announcing that City Commuters will be forced to pay for late night on-street parking tried to claim that the additional 2 million dollars that is expected to be generated will be used to pay for Melbourne’s Trees. I guess he could suggest that money will pay for Hospital care or some other emotional cause in need of funding to justify the cash grab.

The benefit is that the Council will need to ensure that Grey ghost Traffic offers are available to enforce the on street parking fees, but this comes at a further cost and risk to officer security. Many car parking spaces are in low security poor lighting areas.

The fees certainly do nothing to assist Melbourne’s declining retail trade sector with more and more businesses leaving the CDB for the suburban shopping center.

In the meantime Melbourne’s bonus congestion Tax is still being spent on non commuter projects such as the free tourist bus. The City Council would be better off freeing up night time and weekend parking and providing a commuter bus service connecting South Yarra with East Melbourne Carlton, Parkville and North Melbourne communities.

City retail in decline Myers scales down Lonsdale Street retail outlet

Myers Melbourne to scale down City outlet amidst concern that City retail is in serious decline.

News realised today indicates that Myers, Melbourne’s iconic retail outlet has decided to close down its Lonsdale Street outlet with hundreds of jobs set to vacate the city center. Myers decision comes as no surprised as suburb outlets and problems associated with traffic access and parking in the city centre undermining the viability of Myers premier store.

Questions are being asked as to what action plan the City Council has to fill the void that will be left standing as yet another major city site faces the prospect of remianing vacant.

teh scaling down of Myers will also have a flow on effect to other city business who rely on passing trade and custom from Myers workers.

We can soon expect more announcements of City retail outlets calling it a day and vacating the City Center.

City retail in decline Myers scales down Lonsdale Street retail outlet

Myers Melbourne to scale down City outlet amidst concern that City retail is in serious decline.

News realised today indicates that Myers, Melbourne’s iconic retail outlet has decided to close down its Lonsdale Street outlet with hundreds of jobs set to vacate the city center. Myers decision comes as no surprised as suburb outlets and problems associated with traffic access and parking in the city centre undermining the viability of Myers premier store.

Questions are being asked as to what action plan the City Council has to fill the void that will be left standing as yet another major city site faces the prospect of remianing vacant.

teh scaling down of Myers will also have a flow on effect to other city business who rely on passing trade and custom from Myers workers.

We can soon expect more announcements of City retail outlets calling it a day and vacating the City Center.

City retail in decline Myers scales down Lonsdale Street retail outlet

Myers Melbourne to scale down City outlet amidst concern that City retail is in serious decline.

News realised today indicates that Myers, Melbourne’s iconic retail outlet has decided to close down its Lonsdale Street outlet with hundreds of jobs set to vacate the city center. Myers decision comes as no surprised as suburb outlets and problems associated with traffic access and parking in the city centre undermining the viability of Myers premier store.

Questions are being asked as to what action plan the City Council has to fill the void that will be left standing as yet another major city site faces the prospect of remianing vacant.

teh scaling down of Myers will also have a flow on effect to other city business who rely on passing trade and custom from Myers workers.

We can soon expect more announcements of City retail outlets calling it a day and vacating the City Center.

Costs up equals visitors down It all depends on how you look at it

The City of Melbourne tries to put a “positive” spin on it.

Less and less Melburnians are travelling into the city but the council points out they are spending more. To anyone else but the City Council this would be ringing alarm bells. It becoming expensive to visit the city centre and costs in transport and parking in particular adds to the overall bill .

The Council tells us that there is less people coming into the city. The State Government has just upped the City coffers and introduced a consumption tax, this will mean more costs and less people visiting the city in 2007.

We can expect that Melbourne’s retailers will soon call it a day or demand a reduction in the rent as more and more Melburnians seek to do their shopping outside the CDB. No doubts the City Council administration will argue that they need to travel abroad to find solutions to the problem. I can see another shopping tour on the Councillors on their schedule.




Tourists help lift CBD spending by $1.5 billion

Source: The Age
ONE-IN-FIVE Melburnians are coming to the city centre less often but spending in the city is growing nonetheless, according to Melbourne City Council research.

City visitors spent an average of $41 every time they came to the CBD last year, compared with $34 two years ago, according to the Central City Users Survey, a biennial snapshot of city trends.

The report found that city visitors spent almost $1.5 billion more than they did in 2004 when the survey was last taken.

Last year, CBD visitors spent an average of $22.5 million every weekday and $24.5 million on weekends.

While the average amount spent every day by city visitors was $15 ? presumably by city workers ? an average spend of $145 a day by interstate and international visitors pushed up the average daily spend to $41.

The survey found that just under half of the city’s 543,000 daily weekday visitors were aged under 30. It also found that 18 per cent of those surveyed said they visited the city centre less often.

There were 72,000 tourists in the city each day; half from interstate, and 31,000 from overseas.