Melbourne City Council – Holding them to account

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Welcome to the 2012 Melbourne City Council Election – Unaligned Independent Candidate’s web site Please vote one below-the-line Anthony van der Craats How To Vote Unfortunately due to unfair and unjust limitations voters wishing to support Independent Candidates MUST vote … Continue reading

Fowles calls for funds disclosure fails to publish his own costs

Lord Mayor hopeful Will Fowles has called for all Candidates running for Lord Mayor to disclose early their campaign expenditure before the poll.

Will Fowles Calls for Campaign Finance Disclosure.

This a cheap grab for headlines as all candidates will have to submit a declaration of expenditure and fundraising as required under new legislation.

Although Fowles has called on candidates to disclose early (how they can account for the cost of the campaign when the campaign is not yet completed is a bit problematic I would think.)

What’s more troubling is that Will Fowles has not lead by example and published his expense statement. Maybe he is waiting for others to show their hand first – but it would make more sense if he published his statements and then called on others to do likewise.

Council in the making

Whilst preference deals are underway a quick look at the form guide indicates that that the results of the election should be known sometime tomorrow. Odds are no single grouping will elect more then one candidate.

Musical Chairs to the tune of “Don’t let me down”

There are nine identifiable groups made up of the usual suspects, running for seven council positions. Two possibly three minor groups will miss out. That means any person on two or higher numbered preference will be scratched out early in the count. The only groups expected to secure more then a quota and have a surplus is the Doyle/Jetter ticket, The Greens and McMullin. Fowles and Ng’s Council tickets will come close but are expected to be just below quota without a surplus. There will be a contest and struggle for poll position for the last two spots which should see either Clark or Snedden elected with an even more outside chance of both or maybe a Doyle’s number two or Garry singer coming up he middle straight and crossing the finish line. First grouping to miss out will be Wellington Lee (A past City Councillor with a good track record of community service), then a toss up between Garry Singer and the Resident’s Collective. They will be the ones to watch to see where there preferences are allocated. Preference deals have to be finalised by Monday and we should be able to assess the likely outcome soon after publication of registered tickets

Confused? Think of it like a game of musical chairs where there is less seats then contestants/groups. When the music stops the scrum for a seat is determined by who has the most weight/votes. It’s all in the order of elimination which in turn is influenced by the flow of preferences and surplus value of the four leading candidates.

Fowles calls for funds disclosure fails to publish his own costs

Lord Mayor hopeful Will Fowles has called for all Candidates running for Lord Mayor to disclose early their campaign expenditure before the poll.

Will Fowles Calls for Campaign Finance Disclosure.

This a cheap grab for headlines as all candidates will have to submit a declaration of expenditure and fundraising as required under new legislation.

Although Fowles has called on candidates to disclose early (how they can account for the cost of the campaign when the campaign is not yet completed is a bit problematic I would think.)

What’s more troubling is that Will Fowles has not lead by example and published his expense statement. Maybe he is waiting for others to show their hand first – but it would make more sense if he published his statements and then called on others to do likewise.

Council in the making

Whilst preference deals are underway a quick look at the form guide indicates that that the results of the election should be known sometime tomorrow. Odds are no single grouping will elect more then one candidate.

Musical Chairs to the tune of “Don’t let me down”

There are nine identifiable groups made up of the usual suspects, running for seven council positions. Two possibly three minor groups will miss out. That means any person on two or higher numbered preference will be scratched out early in the count. The only groups expected to secure more then a quota and have a surplus is the Doyle/Jetter ticket, The Greens and McMullin. Fowles and Ng’s Council tickets will come close but are expected to be just below quota without a surplus. There will be a contest and struggle for poll position for the last two spots which should see either Clark or Snedden elected with an even more outside chance of both or maybe a Doyle’s number two or Garry singer coming up he middle straight and crossing the finish line. First grouping to miss out will be Wellington Lee (A past City Councillor with a good track record of community service), then a toss up between Garry Singer and the Resident’s Collective. They will be the ones to watch to see where there preferences are allocated. Preference deals have to be finalised by Monday and we should be able to assess the likely outcome soon after publication of registered tickets

Confused? Think of it like a game of musical chairs where there is less seats then contestants/groups. When the music stops the scrum for a seat is determined by who has the most weight/votes. It’s all in the order of elimination which in turn is influenced by the flow of preferences and surplus value of the four leading candidates.

Fowles calls for funds disclosure fails to publish his own costs

Lord Mayor hopeful Will Fowles has called for all Candidates running for Lord Mayor to disclose early their campaign expenditure before the poll.

Will Fowles Calls for Campaign Finance Disclosure.

This a cheap grab for headlines as all candidates will have to submit a declaration of expenditure and fundraising as required under new legislation.

Although Fowles has called on candidates to disclose early (how they can account for the cost of the campaign when the campaign is not yet completed is a bit problematic I would think.)

What’s more troubling is that Will Fowles has not lead by example and published his expense statement. Maybe he is waiting for others to show their hand first – but it would make more sense if he published his statements and then called on others to do likewise.

Council in the making

Whilst preference deals are underway a quick look at the form guide indicates that that the results of the election should be known sometime tomorrow. Odds are no single grouping will elect more then one candidate.

Musical Chairs to the tune of “Don’t let me down”

There are nine identifiable groups made up of the usual suspects, running for seven council positions. Two possibly three minor groups will miss out. That means any person on two or higher numbered preference will be scratched out early in the count. The only groups expected to secure more then a quota and have a surplus is the Doyle/Jetter ticket, The Greens and McMullin. Fowles and Ng’s Council tickets will come close but are expected to be just below quota without a surplus. There will be a contest and struggle for poll position for the last two spots which should see either Clark or Snedden elected with an even more outside chance of both or maybe a Doyle’s number two or Garry singer coming up he middle straight and crossing the finish line. First grouping to miss out will be Wellington Lee (A past City Councillor with a good track record of community service), then a toss up between Garry Singer and the Resident’s Collective. They will be the ones to watch to see where there preferences are allocated. Preference deals have to be finalised by Monday and we should be able to assess the likely outcome soon after publication of registered tickets

Confused? Think of it like a game of musical chairs where there is less seats then contestants/groups. When the music stops the scrum for a seat is determined by who has the most weight/votes. It’s all in the order of elimination which in turn is influenced by the flow of preferences and surplus value of the four leading candidates.

City Council in denial John So avoids public review

A case of a plague on both your houses.

The Herald Sun has reported on the growing unrest amongst Melbourne’s residents which comes as no surprise. BUT…

There is more to say about this issue and so little time. The fact is the City Council has only itself to blame and could have and should have done much more.

There was nothing stopping the City Councillors from calling on the State Government to subject the Council to a proper review. We have on many occasions raised this issue. It is not necessary to have John So blessing and the State Government should have and could have acted independently from the Council.

The fact that the City Council is not subjected to a regular review is an indictment against teh State Governments and a blot on Richard Wynne’s leadership. Richard more the anyone knows Melbourne ad the issues involved. Instead of addressing these issues the State government opted for a head in the sand turn a blind eye approach.

The Councillors suppoorting the review should also share some of the blame. They had three years in which to raise these issues, they choose not to, leaving it to teh last minute and allowing John So to scuttle ay hope for a meaningful review.

The Council could have also opened up0 the committee structure and provided more local input and expertise. The Council has failed in all respects to deliver much needed reform, they must share responsibility equally with John So who continues to pander to the popular at the expense of responsible good governance.


Residents put city council on notice

Ian Royall, Herald Sun, March 28, 2008 12:00am

AN alliance of 10 city residents’ groups has fired the first salvo in what it calls the battle for democracy in Melbourne.

The Coalition of Residents Associations has described the voting system for the Melbourne City Council as dysfunctional and undemocratic.

The group wants Local Government Minister Richard Wynne, who was mayor between 1990 and 1991, to intervene.

The push comes after the latest move for an electoral review was defeated by Lord Mayor John So Melbourne Living team at council on Tuesday.

The alliance wants:

POSTAL voting scrapped in favour of attendance voting;

REINTRODUCTION of the wards system;

REVIEW of the popular vote to elect the mayor. It claims the current method favours the richest candidate;

REVIEW of provisions allowing company directors and landlords to vote;

ALL candidates to have been on the electoral roll for at least two years before the election.

Former lord mayor Kevin Chamberlin said Melbourne was exempt from periodic reviews that applied to all other councils in Victoria.

“Melbourne could go for 50 years without a review under the current legislation.”

Cr Fiona Snedden said the city needed a return to one vote one value principles.

She called on the lord mayor to act.

Cr So said he had had fruitful talks with the residents’ groups.

“But six months before the election is not the appropriate time for a review,” Cr So said.

Melbourne is growing by more than 9000 people because of the boundary changes that rope Docklands, North Melbourne and Kensington into the municipality.

The lord mayor said he had worked with the government over the boundary changes and was confident the current system was effective.

Mr Wynne’s spokesman, Dan Ward, said: “The Government does not intend to change the council structure or the voting processes.”

CORA member Jackie Watts said residents hoped transparency could be restored at Town Hall.

Mr Chamberlin said the case for a review was overwhelming.

“There is a lack of transparency and a lack of democracy,” he said.

City Council in denial John So avoids public review

A case of a plague on both your houses.

The Herald Sun has reported on the growing unrest amongst Melbourne’s residents which comes as no surprise. BUT…

There is more to say about this issue and so little time. The fact is the City Council has only itself to blame and could have and should have done much more.

There was nothing stopping the City Councillors from calling on the State Government to subject the Council to a proper review. We have on many occasions raised this issue. It is not necessary to have John So blessing and the State Government should have and could have acted independently from the Council.

The fact that the City Council is not subjected to a regular review is an indictment against teh State Governments and a blot on Richard Wynne’s leadership. Richard more the anyone knows Melbourne ad the issues involved. Instead of addressing these issues the State government opted for a head in the sand turn a blind eye approach.

The Councillors suppoorting the review should also share some of the blame. They had three years in which to raise these issues, they choose not to, leaving it to teh last minute and allowing John So to scuttle ay hope for a meaningful review.

The Council could have also opened up0 the committee structure and provided more local input and expertise. The Council has failed in all respects to deliver much needed reform, they must share responsibility equally with John So who continues to pander to the popular at the expense of responsible good governance.


Residents put city council on notice

Ian Royall, Herald Sun, March 28, 2008 12:00am

AN alliance of 10 city residents’ groups has fired the first salvo in what it calls the battle for democracy in Melbourne.

The Coalition of Residents Associations has described the voting system for the Melbourne City Council as dysfunctional and undemocratic.

The group wants Local Government Minister Richard Wynne, who was mayor between 1990 and 1991, to intervene.

The push comes after the latest move for an electoral review was defeated by Lord Mayor John So Melbourne Living team at council on Tuesday.

The alliance wants:

POSTAL voting scrapped in favour of attendance voting;

REINTRODUCTION of the wards system;

REVIEW of the popular vote to elect the mayor. It claims the current method favours the richest candidate;

REVIEW of provisions allowing company directors and landlords to vote;

ALL candidates to have been on the electoral roll for at least two years before the election.

Former lord mayor Kevin Chamberlin said Melbourne was exempt from periodic reviews that applied to all other councils in Victoria.

“Melbourne could go for 50 years without a review under the current legislation.”

Cr Fiona Snedden said the city needed a return to one vote one value principles.

She called on the lord mayor to act.

Cr So said he had had fruitful talks with the residents’ groups.

“But six months before the election is not the appropriate time for a review,” Cr So said.

Melbourne is growing by more than 9000 people because of the boundary changes that rope Docklands, North Melbourne and Kensington into the municipality.

The lord mayor said he had worked with the government over the boundary changes and was confident the current system was effective.

Mr Wynne’s spokesman, Dan Ward, said: “The Government does not intend to change the council structure or the voting processes.”

CORA member Jackie Watts said residents hoped transparency could be restored at Town Hall.

Mr Chamberlin said the case for a review was overwhelming.

“There is a lack of transparency and a lack of democracy,” he said.

City Council in denial John So avoids public review

A case of a plague on both your houses.

The Herald Sun has reported on the growing unrest amongst Melbourne’s residents which comes as no surprise. BUT…

There is more to say about this issue and so little time. The fact is the City Council has only itself to blame and could have and should have done much more.

There was nothing stopping the City Councillors from calling on the State Government to subject the Council to a proper review. We have on many occasions raised this issue. It is not necessary to have John So blessing and the State Government should have and could have acted independently from the Council.

The fact that the City Council is not subjected to a regular review is an indictment against teh State Governments and a blot on Richard Wynne’s leadership. Richard more the anyone knows Melbourne ad the issues involved. Instead of addressing these issues the State government opted for a head in the sand turn a blind eye approach.

The Councillors suppoorting the review should also share some of the blame. They had three years in which to raise these issues, they choose not to, leaving it to teh last minute and allowing John So to scuttle ay hope for a meaningful review.

The Council could have also opened up0 the committee structure and provided more local input and expertise. The Council has failed in all respects to deliver much needed reform, they must share responsibility equally with John So who continues to pander to the popular at the expense of responsible good governance.


Residents put city council on notice

Ian Royall, Herald Sun, March 28, 2008 12:00am

AN alliance of 10 city residents’ groups has fired the first salvo in what it calls the battle for democracy in Melbourne.

The Coalition of Residents Associations has described the voting system for the Melbourne City Council as dysfunctional and undemocratic.

The group wants Local Government Minister Richard Wynne, who was mayor between 1990 and 1991, to intervene.

The push comes after the latest move for an electoral review was defeated by Lord Mayor John So Melbourne Living team at council on Tuesday.

The alliance wants:

POSTAL voting scrapped in favour of attendance voting;

REINTRODUCTION of the wards system;

REVIEW of the popular vote to elect the mayor. It claims the current method favours the richest candidate;

REVIEW of provisions allowing company directors and landlords to vote;

ALL candidates to have been on the electoral roll for at least two years before the election.

Former lord mayor Kevin Chamberlin said Melbourne was exempt from periodic reviews that applied to all other councils in Victoria.

“Melbourne could go for 50 years without a review under the current legislation.”

Cr Fiona Snedden said the city needed a return to one vote one value principles.

She called on the lord mayor to act.

Cr So said he had had fruitful talks with the residents’ groups.

“But six months before the election is not the appropriate time for a review,” Cr So said.

Melbourne is growing by more than 9000 people because of the boundary changes that rope Docklands, North Melbourne and Kensington into the municipality.

The lord mayor said he had worked with the government over the boundary changes and was confident the current system was effective.

Mr Wynne’s spokesman, Dan Ward, said: “The Government does not intend to change the council structure or the voting processes.”

CORA member Jackie Watts said residents hoped transparency could be restored at Town Hall.

Mr Chamberlin said the case for a review was overwhelming.

“There is a lack of transparency and a lack of democracy,” he said.

Legionella plagues Melbourne City once again This times it’s Melbourne City Council’s show case eco-center ‘Council House2’ that’s effected

Melbourne is once again inflicted with the potential outbreak of the deadly Legionella bacteria which has previously claimed lives and resulted in the closure of Melbourne’s Aquarium.

Now it is the City Council’s newest and latest pride and joy the Council House2 that is infected with the deadly bacteria.

Legionella found in Melbourne building
Source: The Age

The potentially deadly bacterium legionella has been found during an inspection of the cooling system of Melbourne City Council’s new green Council House 2 building.

Low levels of the potentially deadly bacterium have been found in the cooling system less than six months after the $51 million building opened.

The council said that the legionella was a low risk strain that did not pose a risk to staff or the public.

The discovery did not reflect badly on the building’s cutting edge reputation, Lord Mayor John So told Fairfax.

Staff were told of the test result last week.

The Human Services department has since inspected the building in Little Collins Street and declared no risk to staff working there.

Five-hundred-and-forty council staff work in the 10-storey building.

Legionella plagues Melbourne City once again This times it’s Melbourne City Council’s show case eco-center ‘Council House2’ that’s effected

Melbourne is once again inflicted with the potential outbreak of the deadly Legionella bacteria which has previously claimed lives and resulted in the closure of Melbourne’s Aquarium.

Now it is the City Council’s newest and latest pride and joy the Council House2 that is infected with the deadly bacteria.

Legionella found in Melbourne building
Source: The Age

The potentially deadly bacterium legionella has been found during an inspection of the cooling system of Melbourne City Council’s new green Council House 2 building.

Low levels of the potentially deadly bacterium have been found in the cooling system less than six months after the $51 million building opened.

The council said that the legionella was a low risk strain that did not pose a risk to staff or the public.

The discovery did not reflect badly on the building’s cutting edge reputation, Lord Mayor John So told Fairfax.

Staff were told of the test result last week.

The Human Services department has since inspected the building in Little Collins Street and declared no risk to staff working there.

Five-hundred-and-forty council staff work in the 10-storey building.

Legionella plagues Melbourne City once again This times it’s Melbourne City Council’s show case eco-center ‘Council House2’ that’s effected

Melbourne is once again inflicted with the potential outbreak of the deadly Legionella bacteria which has previously claimed lives and resulted in the closure of Melbourne’s Aquarium.

Now it is the City Council’s newest and latest pride and joy the Council House2 that is infected with the deadly bacteria.

Legionella found in Melbourne building
Source: The Age

The potentially deadly bacterium legionella has been found during an inspection of the cooling system of Melbourne City Council’s new green Council House 2 building.

Low levels of the potentially deadly bacterium have been found in the cooling system less than six months after the $51 million building opened.

The council said that the legionella was a low risk strain that did not pose a risk to staff or the public.

The discovery did not reflect badly on the building’s cutting edge reputation, Lord Mayor John So told Fairfax.

Staff were told of the test result last week.

The Human Services department has since inspected the building in Little Collins Street and declared no risk to staff working there.

Five-hundred-and-forty council staff work in the 10-storey building.