The Show goes on Failed ex-former Deputy McClown continues to thrill audiences down in Geelong

The Age, Royce Millar, writes an interesting follow-up article which implicates failed former City of Melbourne deputy Lord Mayor McMullin (alias McClown) Peter McMullin was Deputy for a year only before being ousted from the job. He latter stood for election in the Central Ward and later tried to run for Deputy Lord Mayor but was unsuccessful. Peter McMullin is mainly remembered for rating on his election promises and caving in on demands made by former State Premier Jeff Kennett. McClown sold out on and supported the location of Melbourne’s State Museum which was moved from the South banks of the Yarra River, to make way for Jeff’s Shed and Crown Casino, relegated to the Royal Exhibition Buildings in 1996. At the time the community debate was against the development and its impact on Melbourne’s historic Royal Exhibition Buildings. Peter McMullin was most remembered for his refusal to support a motion that called on the State Government of the time to subject the proposed Museum Development to a proper planning review. Peter McMullin sold out so much he would not even hold the State Government and the City Council to a proper planning process.


Peter McClown, having failed to make his mark in the Melbourne stage, relocated to Geelong were he has been running the show on the second stage. It comes as little surprise that Peter McMullin is now caught up in controversy in his new act.


Regrettable insight into local business

Royce Millar
June 9, 2006

THE report into Geelong’s cash-for-councillor scandal gives Victorians a rare insight into how business is too often done at local government level in this state.

While the report cites Labor councillor David Saunderson for a possible breach of the Local Government Act, the alleged transgression is more a sign of a broader problem than a resolution of the Geelong row.

Geelong is Victoria’s second city, yet in many ways it operates like a country town. A small group of political and corporate powerbrokers tends to mingle around business and community projects, blurring the line between the public and private good.

Local ratepayers have been understandably unimpressed by the council’s handling of this issue since The Age revealed the corporate donations in January.

After initially denying any such support, Cr Saunderson changed his story and admitted receiving assistance. Two other councillors also owned up.

At the time Mayor Peter McMullin said their admissions should be the end of the matter and called for everyone to “move on”.

Instead we got the Whelan inquiry. And while its terms of reference were probably too restrictive, it at least reveals the extent of the previously secret business backing for candidates, including for Cr McMullin.

Disturbing to many will be that council candidates believe it acceptable to receive support from powerful businessmen like Geelong Football Club president Frank Costa, and then preside over major development projects proposed by their backers without declaring an interest.

This was the case with Mr Costa’s $100 million HomeTown project. When it was first considered by the council last year, not one of the councillors he supported thought to put a hand up to declare a potential conflict of interest.

The Geelong saga also raises questions about whether recent State Government amendments to the Local Government Act, requiring the declaration of council campaign donations, are tough enough.

There is a real irony in this story because it emerged just as Geelong was starting to drag itself out of the economic doldrums and enjoy a mini boom in population and investment. It was people like Frank Costa who insisted Geelong needed a better quality of council to ensure the city made the most of the good times. As is so often the case with Geelong, the city’s fortunes seem to run parallel with its beloved football club.

The Show goes on Failed ex-former Deputy McClown continues to thrill audiences down in Geelong

The Age, Royce Millar, writes an interesting follow-up article which implicates failed former City of Melbourne deputy Lord Mayor McMullin (alias McClown) Peter McMullin was Deputy for a year only before being ousted from the job. He latter stood for election in the Central Ward and later tried to run for Deputy Lord Mayor but was unsuccessful. Peter McMullin is mainly remembered for rating on his election promises and caving in on demands made by former State Premier Jeff Kennett. McClown sold out on and supported the location of Melbourne’s State Museum which was moved from the South banks of the Yarra River, to make way for Jeff’s Shed and Crown Casino, relegated to the Royal Exhibition Buildings in 1996. At the time the community debate was against the development and its impact on Melbourne’s historic Royal Exhibition Buildings. Peter McMullin was most remembered for his refusal to support a motion that called on the State Government of the time to subject the proposed Museum Development to a proper planning review. Peter McMullin sold out so much he would not even hold the State Government and the City Council to a proper planning process.


Peter McClown, having failed to make his mark in the Melbourne stage, relocated to Geelong were he has been running the show on the second stage. It comes as little surprise that Peter McMullin is now caught up in controversy in his new act.


Regrettable insight into local business

Royce Millar
June 9, 2006

THE report into Geelong’s cash-for-councillor scandal gives Victorians a rare insight into how business is too often done at local government level in this state.

While the report cites Labor councillor David Saunderson for a possible breach of the Local Government Act, the alleged transgression is more a sign of a broader problem than a resolution of the Geelong row.

Geelong is Victoria’s second city, yet in many ways it operates like a country town. A small group of political and corporate powerbrokers tends to mingle around business and community projects, blurring the line between the public and private good.

Local ratepayers have been understandably unimpressed by the council’s handling of this issue since The Age revealed the corporate donations in January.

After initially denying any such support, Cr Saunderson changed his story and admitted receiving assistance. Two other councillors also owned up.

At the time Mayor Peter McMullin said their admissions should be the end of the matter and called for everyone to “move on”.

Instead we got the Whelan inquiry. And while its terms of reference were probably too restrictive, it at least reveals the extent of the previously secret business backing for candidates, including for Cr McMullin.

Disturbing to many will be that council candidates believe it acceptable to receive support from powerful businessmen like Geelong Football Club president Frank Costa, and then preside over major development projects proposed by their backers without declaring an interest.

This was the case with Mr Costa’s $100 million HomeTown project. When it was first considered by the council last year, not one of the councillors he supported thought to put a hand up to declare a potential conflict of interest.

The Geelong saga also raises questions about whether recent State Government amendments to the Local Government Act, requiring the declaration of council campaign donations, are tough enough.

There is a real irony in this story because it emerged just as Geelong was starting to drag itself out of the economic doldrums and enjoy a mini boom in population and investment. It was people like Frank Costa who insisted Geelong needed a better quality of council to ensure the city made the most of the good times. As is so often the case with Geelong, the city’s fortunes seem to run parallel with its beloved football club.

The Show goes on Failed ex-former Deputy McClown continues to thrill audiences down in Geelong

The Age, Royce Millar, writes an interesting follow-up article which implicates failed former City of Melbourne deputy Lord Mayor McMullin (alias McClown) Peter McMullin was Deputy for a year only before being ousted from the job. He latter stood for election in the Central Ward and later tried to run for Deputy Lord Mayor but was unsuccessful. Peter McMullin is mainly remembered for rating on his election promises and caving in on demands made by former State Premier Jeff Kennett. McClown sold out on and supported the location of Melbourne’s State Museum which was moved from the South banks of the Yarra River, to make way for Jeff’s Shed and Crown Casino, relegated to the Royal Exhibition Buildings in 1996. At the time the community debate was against the development and its impact on Melbourne’s historic Royal Exhibition Buildings. Peter McMullin was most remembered for his refusal to support a motion that called on the State Government of the time to subject the proposed Museum Development to a proper planning review. Peter McMullin sold out so much he would not even hold the State Government and the City Council to a proper planning process.


Peter McClown, having failed to make his mark in the Melbourne stage, relocated to Geelong were he has been running the show on the second stage. It comes as little surprise that Peter McMullin is now caught up in controversy in his new act.


Regrettable insight into local business

Royce Millar
June 9, 2006

THE report into Geelong’s cash-for-councillor scandal gives Victorians a rare insight into how business is too often done at local government level in this state.

While the report cites Labor councillor David Saunderson for a possible breach of the Local Government Act, the alleged transgression is more a sign of a broader problem than a resolution of the Geelong row.

Geelong is Victoria’s second city, yet in many ways it operates like a country town. A small group of political and corporate powerbrokers tends to mingle around business and community projects, blurring the line between the public and private good.

Local ratepayers have been understandably unimpressed by the council’s handling of this issue since The Age revealed the corporate donations in January.

After initially denying any such support, Cr Saunderson changed his story and admitted receiving assistance. Two other councillors also owned up.

At the time Mayor Peter McMullin said their admissions should be the end of the matter and called for everyone to “move on”.

Instead we got the Whelan inquiry. And while its terms of reference were probably too restrictive, it at least reveals the extent of the previously secret business backing for candidates, including for Cr McMullin.

Disturbing to many will be that council candidates believe it acceptable to receive support from powerful businessmen like Geelong Football Club president Frank Costa, and then preside over major development projects proposed by their backers without declaring an interest.

This was the case with Mr Costa’s $100 million HomeTown project. When it was first considered by the council last year, not one of the councillors he supported thought to put a hand up to declare a potential conflict of interest.

The Geelong saga also raises questions about whether recent State Government amendments to the Local Government Act, requiring the declaration of council campaign donations, are tough enough.

There is a real irony in this story because it emerged just as Geelong was starting to drag itself out of the economic doldrums and enjoy a mini boom in population and investment. It was people like Frank Costa who insisted Geelong needed a better quality of council to ensure the city made the most of the good times. As is so often the case with Geelong, the city’s fortunes seem to run parallel with its beloved football club.

McClown pays visit to Mao Old Habits die hard as Melbourne’s former one year term Deputy flys to China at Geelong’s expense

The Geelong News reports that Peter McMullin, Former Melbourne City Councillor and currently Mayor of Geelong) has dipped into Geelong Ratepayers coffers to fund a trip to China. McMullen (also referred to McClown) was sacked as Melbourne Deputy Lord Mayor in 1997 having only served one year as Deputy to failed Lord Mayor Ivan Deveson. The reason being he ratted on his collegues and promises givin to the electorate.

McClown is also remembered for his University days where as a devote Maoist he campaigned against the Zionist cause as he sang praise and reiterated quotes from Chairman Mao’s little red book.

The Geelong News reports that McClown had spent over $8,000 on a three day visit to China raising ongoing concern about the misuse and abuse of Council funded overseas travel.

Under the provisions of the Local Government Act and regulations City Councils MUST maintain a travel register of all overseas and interstate travel undertaken by City Councillors and or Staff.

It is unknown if any staff from the City of Geelong accompanied Geelong’s Mayor on his China tour. Past experiences from the City of Melbourne show that additional costs are picked up and allocated to the staff members travel accounts which tend to go unnoticed. It is also not known if the City of Geelong has adopted Melbourne City Council’s creative accounting methods where cost occurred are not disclosed nor recorded on any expense statements.

Peter MCMullin was implicated in the Geelong City Council Campaign funding scandal that surfaced earlier this year.

McClown pays visit to Mao Old Habits die hard as Melbourne’s former one year term Deputy flys to China at Geelong’s expense

The Geelong News reports that Peter McMullin, Former Melbourne City Councillor and currently Mayor of Geelong) has dipped into Geelong Ratepayers coffers to fund a trip to China. McMullen (also referred to McClown) was sacked as Melbourne Deputy Lord Mayor in 1997 having only served one year as Deputy to failed Lord Mayor Ivan Deveson. The reason being he ratted on his collegues and promises givin to the electorate.

McClown is also remembered for his University days where as a devote Maoist he campaigned against the Zionist cause as he sang praise and reiterated quotes from Chairman Mao’s little red book.

The Geelong News reports that McClown had spent over $8,000 on a three day visit to China raising ongoing concern about the misuse and abuse of Council funded overseas travel.

Under the provisions of the Local Government Act and regulations City Councils MUST maintain a travel register of all overseas and interstate travel undertaken by City Councillors and or Staff.

It is unknown if any staff from the City of Geelong accompanied Geelong’s Mayor on his China tour. Past experiences from the City of Melbourne show that additional costs are picked up and allocated to the staff members travel accounts which tend to go unnoticed. It is also not known if the City of Geelong has adopted Melbourne City Council’s creative accounting methods where cost occurred are not disclosed nor recorded on any expense statements.

Peter MCMullin was implicated in the Geelong City Council Campaign funding scandal that surfaced earlier this year.

McClown pays visit to Mao Old Habits die hard as Melbourne’s former one year term Deputy flys to China at Geelong’s expense

The Geelong News reports that Peter McMullin, Former Melbourne City Councillor and currently Mayor of Geelong) has dipped into Geelong Ratepayers coffers to fund a trip to China. McMullen (also referred to McClown) was sacked as Melbourne Deputy Lord Mayor in 1997 having only served one year as Deputy to failed Lord Mayor Ivan Deveson. The reason being he ratted on his collegues and promises givin to the electorate.

McClown is also remembered for his University days where as a devote Maoist he campaigned against the Zionist cause as he sang praise and reiterated quotes from Chairman Mao’s little red book.

The Geelong News reports that McClown had spent over $8,000 on a three day visit to China raising ongoing concern about the misuse and abuse of Council funded overseas travel.

Under the provisions of the Local Government Act and regulations City Councils MUST maintain a travel register of all overseas and interstate travel undertaken by City Councillors and or Staff.

It is unknown if any staff from the City of Geelong accompanied Geelong’s Mayor on his China tour. Past experiences from the City of Melbourne show that additional costs are picked up and allocated to the staff members travel accounts which tend to go unnoticed. It is also not known if the City of Geelong has adopted Melbourne City Council’s creative accounting methods where cost occurred are not disclosed nor recorded on any expense statements.

Peter MCMullin was implicated in the Geelong City Council Campaign funding scandal that surfaced earlier this year.

Conflict of Interest Former Deputy Clown questions conflict of Interest

Melbourne City Council’s former Deputy Lord Mayor, Peter McMullin (alias Peter McClown) is in the news again this time in his new stomping ground and new role as Geelong’s Mayor.

The Age – Geelong mayors back inquiry

Cr Peter McMullin, who is also supposedly a lawyer having studied Law at Melbourne University, told The Age that the conflict of interest provisions in the act were unclear. “The legal environment is incredibly confused, as to what’s an interest, what’s a conflict of interest, a pecuniary interest.”

We would have thought it was pretty straight forward and that given his years of experience as a Lawyer and Local Government practitioner he would have had some Idea by now. (But according to comments made by John Howie from Howie and Maher who took over representation of Community Radio station 3CR you can never tell.)


If in doubt don’t leave it out.

If you have a pecuniary interest either direct or indirect then there is a potential for a conflict of Interest. An interest could come in the form of direct payments or indirect payment such as receiving kick backs, gifts or donations.

The provisions of Victorian Local Government Act 1989 endeavour to set out what those responsibilities are but, as is often the case with Lawyers when their clients who are caught between a rock and a hard place or in the case of Geellong a community and a developer, they never know.

This question is asked all the time down that City of Melbourne Clown Hall.
The City of Melbourne has a clear cut policy where the Council does not provide legal advise to Councillors in respect to issues of conflict of interest provisions.

A sound policy and one that should apply in all cases where personal legal advice is requested.

The City Council is not qualified to provide a free legal advisory service. Any decisions to seek personal legal advice should always be a decision of the elected Council as a whole and then only in the interest of the Council as a whole and not any individual councillor. In the case of a primary assessment advise should only be given with the consent of the relevant committee chairperson or in the course of responding to recommendations before Council . The problem being of course if the Council provides legal advice and that advice is later found to be defective (which was often the case with advice provided by Melbourne City Council’s former legal governance officer, Alison Lyons) is that it leaves the City Council wide open to abuse and possible corruption and misuse of council’s resources not to mention questions of professional liability.

Councillor McClown, who held the position of Melbourne Deputy Lord Mayor for one year before being dumped from the position in 1997, being a lawyer should know full well this fact.

We often wonder if McClown had a conflict of interest when he all of a sudden backed down and refused to support a call for the State Government to subject the then proposed Museum development in the Carlton Gardens to a proper planning process. (The motion lost by one vote)

To this day no satisfactory explanation has been provided by McMullin as to why he refused to support the motion. Had the Museum Development undergone a proper planning assessment the Museum might not have been built were it is today and would not be in the financial trouble it now finds itself i and Melbourne would have been that much better off.

The problems and accusations of conflict of Interest in Geelong is a one that has captured the attention of all Municipal Councils through out Australia and has spilled over into the bloggersphere. One suggestion that was logged is that Councillor McMullin should set an example and help put the issues under debate to rest by submitting a statutory declarations and
calling on his fellow councillors to do likewise.


In the mean-time we will along with the rest will watch with ever increasing interest the outcome.

Conflict of Interest Former Deputy Clown questions conflict of Interest

Melbourne City Council’s former Deputy Lord Mayor, Peter McMullin (alias Peter McClown) is in the news again this time in his new stomping ground and new role as Geelong’s Mayor.

The Age – Geelong mayors back inquiry

Cr Peter McMullin, who is also supposedly a lawyer having studied Law at Melbourne University, told The Age that the conflict of interest provisions in the act were unclear. “The legal environment is incredibly confused, as to what’s an interest, what’s a conflict of interest, a pecuniary interest.”

We would have thought it was pretty straight forward and that given his years of experience as a Lawyer and Local Government practitioner he would have had some Idea by now. (But according to comments made by John Howie from Howie and Maher who took over representation of Community Radio station 3CR you can never tell.)


If in doubt don’t leave it out.

If you have a pecuniary interest either direct or indirect then there is a potential for a conflict of Interest. An interest could come in the form of direct payments or indirect payment such as receiving kick backs, gifts or donations.

The provisions of Victorian Local Government Act 1989 endeavour to set out what those responsibilities are but, as is often the case with Lawyers when their clients who are caught between a rock and a hard place or in the case of Geellong a community and a developer, they never know.

This question is asked all the time down that City of Melbourne Clown Hall.
The City of Melbourne has a clear cut policy where the Council does not provide legal advise to Councillors in respect to issues of conflict of interest provisions.

A sound policy and one that should apply in all cases where personal legal advice is requested.

The City Council is not qualified to provide a free legal advisory service. Any decisions to seek personal legal advice should always be a decision of the elected Council as a whole and then only in the interest of the Council as a whole and not any individual councillor. In the case of a primary assessment advise should only be given with the consent of the relevant committee chairperson or in the course of responding to recommendations before Council . The problem being of course if the Council provides legal advice and that advice is later found to be defective (which was often the case with advice provided by Melbourne City Council’s former legal governance officer, Alison Lyons) is that it leaves the City Council wide open to abuse and possible corruption and misuse of council’s resources not to mention questions of professional liability.

Councillor McClown, who held the position of Melbourne Deputy Lord Mayor for one year before being dumped from the position in 1997, being a lawyer should know full well this fact.

We often wonder if McClown had a conflict of interest when he all of a sudden backed down and refused to support a call for the State Government to subject the then proposed Museum development in the Carlton Gardens to a proper planning process. (The motion lost by one vote)

To this day no satisfactory explanation has been provided by McMullin as to why he refused to support the motion. Had the Museum Development undergone a proper planning assessment the Museum might not have been built were it is today and would not be in the financial trouble it now finds itself i and Melbourne would have been that much better off.

The problems and accusations of conflict of Interest in Geelong is a one that has captured the attention of all Municipal Councils through out Australia and has spilled over into the bloggersphere. One suggestion that was logged is that Councillor McMullin should set an example and help put the issues under debate to rest by submitting a statutory declarations and
calling on his fellow councillors to do likewise.


In the mean-time we will along with the rest will watch with ever increasing interest the outcome.

Conflict of Interest Former Deputy Clown questions conflict of Interest

Melbourne City Council’s former Deputy Lord Mayor, Peter McMullin (alias Peter McClown) is in the news again this time in his new stomping ground and new role as Geelong’s Mayor.

The Age – Geelong mayors back inquiry

Cr Peter McMullin, who is also supposedly a lawyer having studied Law at Melbourne University, told The Age that the conflict of interest provisions in the act were unclear. “The legal environment is incredibly confused, as to what’s an interest, what’s a conflict of interest, a pecuniary interest.”

We would have thought it was pretty straight forward and that given his years of experience as a Lawyer and Local Government practitioner he would have had some Idea by now. (But according to comments made by John Howie from Howie and Maher who took over representation of Community Radio station 3CR you can never tell.)


If in doubt don’t leave it out.

If you have a pecuniary interest either direct or indirect then there is a potential for a conflict of Interest. An interest could come in the form of direct payments or indirect payment such as receiving kick backs, gifts or donations.

The provisions of Victorian Local Government Act 1989 endeavour to set out what those responsibilities are but, as is often the case with Lawyers when their clients who are caught between a rock and a hard place or in the case of Geellong a community and a developer, they never know.

This question is asked all the time down that City of Melbourne Clown Hall.
The City of Melbourne has a clear cut policy where the Council does not provide legal advise to Councillors in respect to issues of conflict of interest provisions.

A sound policy and one that should apply in all cases where personal legal advice is requested.

The City Council is not qualified to provide a free legal advisory service. Any decisions to seek personal legal advice should always be a decision of the elected Council as a whole and then only in the interest of the Council as a whole and not any individual councillor. In the case of a primary assessment advise should only be given with the consent of the relevant committee chairperson or in the course of responding to recommendations before Council . The problem being of course if the Council provides legal advice and that advice is later found to be defective (which was often the case with advice provided by Melbourne City Council’s former legal governance officer, Alison Lyons) is that it leaves the City Council wide open to abuse and possible corruption and misuse of council’s resources not to mention questions of professional liability.

Councillor McClown, who held the position of Melbourne Deputy Lord Mayor for one year before being dumped from the position in 1997, being a lawyer should know full well this fact.

We often wonder if McClown had a conflict of interest when he all of a sudden backed down and refused to support a call for the State Government to subject the then proposed Museum development in the Carlton Gardens to a proper planning process. (The motion lost by one vote)

To this day no satisfactory explanation has been provided by McMullin as to why he refused to support the motion. Had the Museum Development undergone a proper planning assessment the Museum might not have been built were it is today and would not be in the financial trouble it now finds itself i and Melbourne would have been that much better off.

The problems and accusations of conflict of Interest in Geelong is a one that has captured the attention of all Municipal Councils through out Australia and has spilled over into the bloggersphere. One suggestion that was logged is that Councillor McMullin should set an example and help put the issues under debate to rest by submitting a statutory declarations and
calling on his fellow councillors to do likewise.


In the mean-time we will along with the rest will watch with ever increasing interest the outcome.

The Clown’s review Maoist, Anti-Zionist and betrayer of the people. A review of career and the face behind the makeup of Peter (Pan) McClown

Review of the life and career of a Clown based on the true life story of an Aged Sleepy Hollow actor.

Peter McClown, former disgraced Deputy Lord Clown of Clown Hall, the same McClown who sold out his Melbourne audience and supporters is now seeking to sell off Geelong’s reputation and past heritage. He wants to build a commercial bridge across Yarra Street cutting off benefits to side alley traders.

Yes the same McClown that was elected to the City of Melbourne Clown Hall in 1996 on a platform of support for tradition, heritage preservation and opposition to the location of Melbourne’s Museum adjacent to the historical Royal Exhibition Buildings in the Carlton Gardens.

Within months of being nominated to the Deputy Clown role McClown soon betrayed his promoters and loyal supporters. He could not have bent over backwards fast enough to assist and please the King Ring Master, Jeffery “Gibson” Kennett, who continued to gamble and was seeking revenge for his past failed efforts to destroy Melbourne’s historic stage.

McClown would not support or advocate even the slightest change to Jeff’s script. He was a devoted disciple of destruction and to everyones amazment voted against a motion (which lost by one vote) calling on the design of the Museum development to be subjected to an independent economic review and proper planning assessment. It was a reasonable, simple, request but he McClown would not support it.

Having sold-out his constituent investors, McClown, whose performance was not that good and declining faster then a sinking ship, was soon removed from his role as Deputy Clown and dumped overboard the following year (Two years short of his expected tenure).

Even though he lost the lead-understudy role and the Deputy’s title he continued to play up on the fact that he once held the position and always mentions in his repertoire that he was once the Deputy and not just the fool.

His attempt to regain access to the centre ring was unsuccessful. He lost his re-election bid in 1999 and failed again, dismally, to secure the top Lord Clown position in 2000, having spent over $300,000.00 promoting his comeback tour.

McClown’s main achievement and talent, apart from selling out on the Museum issue, was how quick and skilled he was at assuming new roles. He should have been an acrobat given the way he flipped and flopped bending over as quick like he did. He was good. He could stick his head between his legs and grin widely whilst sticking out his tongue, trying to pull a funny face hoping to please the ring master.
(With all the make-up he wore you never knew if it was a smile of a frown)

He tried his hand at being an entrepreneur and stitched up a deal with American “exploiter of talent and cheap labour, the god of NIKE, and gave them a $200,000.00 subsidy, sponsored by Melbourne ratepayers, to set up a show in Bourke Street. (We didn’t know that Nike made shoes for Clowns)

Rumours and facts have it he was one of the player-producer-writers behind the fooleries, lies and deceit of the junior-understudy Clown whose performance and antics brought the house down in 2000 resulting in the earlier closure of the 1999-2002 Clown Hall season.

Having failed to make it on the Melbourne stage, McClown moved to a new location, the Geelong-Corangamite region, a sea change to try to win a Federal role from the other troop of actors – the Corangamite Liberato Party. Whilst unsuccessful in 2004 he hopes to try again next time and he may succeed as the current incumbent performer is getting rather old and there is no apparent successor in the wings. McClown hopes to ride the wave of fortune as and when the tide changes.

In the meantime McClown has taken a job at the lesser known theatre at Geelong’s Clown Hall and is continuing to work on and develop his old scripts selling out Geelong’s past heritage and reputation.

My uncle, who was a long time Labor voter and resident of the Corangamite electorate said he could not support or vote for McClown in the last election. His assessment and independent review was made before I even had a chance to explain to him some of the history behind his act and the antics McClown got up to when he was on the Melbourne stage. (Not to mention his time as a student Clown at Melbourne’s law review where he would dress up as a Millionaire’s son and pretend to be Chairman Mao. He would recite his lines and make stupid statements like “religion was the opium of the masses” whilst spousing his hate for the Zionist cause.)

Thankfully some people could see beyond the makeup just how sad this Clown really can be.

“You can fool all of the people some of the time, you can fool some of the people all the time but you can not fool all of the people all the time.”