Call to remove Free Booze from Council’s table

There is growing concern at the level of alcohol the Lord Mayor and Councillors are consuming leaving rate payers to pick up the tab.

The City Council along with members of State and Federal Parliaments need to set an example by removing alcohol from the table and replacing it with less intoxicating beverages. The City Council has a moral and legal duty of care. Staff and Councillors should not be drinking to excess.

Every time you see the Lord Mayor you begin to wonder just how much booze has he been drinking and what effect all this booze is having on his health.

Our City Councillors should undergo a blood test and health check admist concern that some may have a serious drinking problem. Alchole should only be available, if at all, on special occasions accompanied by a full meal. There must be limits placed on the amount of booze supplied to our City Councillors and statesmen. If the City Council provides free booze it encourages excessive drinking which in turn effects the bottom line and our City’s governance

The Lord Mayor, in spite his election promise, has retained the chauffeured driven limousine in order to ensure that he is safely driven from one function to another and returned home safe. At an estimated cost of over $100’000 for the driver and cost of running the limo plus the costs of top shelf beverages the office of the Lord Mayor is costing ratepayers well over half a million dollars a year.

Enough is enough. Our City deserves better, We can no longer support drunken councillors running our City. Booze must be removed from the menu. if Councillors want a drink then they can visit some of Melbourne’s bars and pay for it themselves. Rate Payers should not be expected to pick up the tab for their excessive drinking habits.

NBN: No Broadband Network for inner city corridor South of the Yarra


The long awaited National Broadband Network Infrastructure will skip inner city residents South of the Yarra.

Planning and roll out of the NBN continues to be under question as city residents who are the most likely to take up high speed broadband have been sidelined in the proposed roll-out.

Residents and businesses in Port Melbourne, Albert Park, Middle Park, South Melbourne, South Yarra, Prahran, Toorak, Armadale and St Kilda East are not scheduled to to be connected to the NBN in the near future

NBN: No Broadband Network for inner city corridor South of the Yarra


The long awaited National Broadband Network Infrastructure will skip inner city residents South of the Yarra.

Planning and roll out of the NBN continues to be under question as city residents who are the most likely to take up high speed broadband have been sidelined in the proposed roll-out.

Residents and businesses in Port Melbourne, Albert Park, Middle Park, South Melbourne, South Yarra, Prahran, Toorak, Armadale and St Kilda East are not scheduled to to be connected to the NBN in the near future

NBN: No Broadband Network for inner city corridor South of the Yarra


The long awaited National Broadband Network Infrastructure will skip inner city residents South of the Yarra.

Planning and roll out of the NBN continues to be under question as city residents who are the most likely to take up high speed broadband have been sidelined in the proposed roll-out.

Residents and businesses in Port Melbourne, Albert Park, Middle Park, South Melbourne, South Yarra, Prahran, Toorak, Armadale and St Kilda East are not scheduled to to be connected to the NBN in the near future

2008 Under the 2012 model

We decided out of interest to apply the 2008 vote under the new proposed model of nine Councillors.

It should be noted that this is indicative only. For the sake of the exercise we excluded Peter Clark from the count. He was replaced by Jackie Watts. (This time she was elected in her own right)

Elected Candidate Group
1 JETTER, Carl JETTER
2 OKE, Cathy GREENS
3 LOUEY, Kevin McMULLIN
4 ONG, Ken TEAMMELB
5 SHANAHAN, Brian SHANNAHAN
6 KANIS, Jennifer FOWLES
7 BINI, Luciano JETTER
8 LEPPERT, Rohan GREENS
9 WATTS, Jackie MORGAN

* Results indicative only

2008 Under the 2012 model

We decided out of interest to apply the 2008 vote under the new proposed model of nine Councillors.

It should be noted that this is indicative only. For the sake of the exercise we excluded Peter Clark from the count. He was replaced by Jackie Watts. (This time she was elected in her own right)

Elected Candidate Group
1 JETTER, Carl JETTER
2 OKE, Cathy GREENS
3 LOUEY, Kevin McMULLIN
4 ONG, Ken TEAMMELB
5 SHANAHAN, Brian SHANNAHAN
6 KANIS, Jennifer FOWLES
7 BINI, Luciano JETTER
8 LEPPERT, Rohan GREENS
9 WATTS, Jackie MORGAN

* Results indicative only

2008 Under the 2012 model

We decided out of interest to apply the 2008 vote under the new proposed model of nine Councillors.

It should be noted that this is indicative only. For the sake of the exercise we excluded Peter Clark from the count. He was replaced by Jackie Watts. (This time she was elected in her own right)

Elected Candidate Group
1 JETTER, Carl JETTER
2 OKE, Cathy GREENS
3 LOUEY, Kevin McMULLIN
4 ONG, Ken TEAMMELB
5 SHANAHAN, Brian SHANNAHAN
6 KANIS, Jennifer FOWLES
7 BINI, Luciano JETTER
8 LEPPERT, Rohan GREENS
9 WATTS, Jackie MORGAN

* Results indicative only

Commission recommends increase in City Representation

The Victorian Electoral Commission has recommended in its final report that the level of representation of the City of Melbourne be increased from 9 to 11 Councillors – 2 City wide Councillors plus the Lord Mayor and Deputy Lord Mayor team)

The Commission failed to address concerns related to the method of election of the Lord Mayor and Deputy Lord Mayor and the City’s external boundaries and voter franchise.The Commissions report also failed to address concerns in relation to the above the line voting, calculation of the surplus transfer value and count-back process used in fulfilling casual vacancies. The terms of reference of the Commission review prevented it from addressing the real issues effecting the City Council.

Putting the limitations of the review aside the recommendation to increase the level of representation and maintain a city wide electorate is a positive for Melbourne. A ward system based on geographical boundaries would have divided the city and communities of interest.


The Council votes as a whole and should be elected as a whole.

The geographical size of the Council is not too large (Similar in size to a State or Federal electorate).

Under the system of proportional representation, in spite concerns about the serious flaws in the way votes are counted and issues pertaining to the voter franchise – the City wide multi-member electorate is the most democratic.

An increase from seven to nine members elected city wide would ensure on average that 95% of the electorate would be represented by a representative of their choosing, where in a single member electorate up to 49% of the electorate would be disenfranchised.

Whilst there is ongoing urgent need for review of the City’s electoral system, its external boundaries and the election of the Lord Mayor and Deputy Lord Mayor – the recommendations proposed in the final report should be supported.

Commission recommends increase in City Representation

The Victorian Electoral Commission has recommended in its final report that the level of representation of the City of Melbourne be increased from 9 to 11 Councillors – 2 City wide Councillors plus the Lord Mayor and Deputy Lord Mayor team)

The Commission failed to address concerns related to the method of election of the Lord Mayor and Deputy Lord Mayor and the City’s external boundaries and voter franchise.The Commissions report also failed to address concerns in relation to the above the line voting, calculation of the surplus transfer value and count-back process used in fulfilling casual vacancies. The terms of reference of the Commission review prevented it from addressing the real issues effecting the City Council.

Putting the limitations of the review aside the recommendation to increase the level of representation and maintain a city wide electorate is a positive for Melbourne. A ward system based on geographical boundaries would have divided the city and communities of interest.


The Council votes as a whole and should be elected as a whole.

The geographical size of the Council is not too large (Similar in size to a State or Federal electorate).

Under the system of proportional representation, in spite concerns about the serious flaws in the way votes are counted and issues pertaining to the voter franchise – the City wide multi-member electorate is the most democratic.

An increase from seven to nine members elected city wide would ensure on average that 95% of the electorate would be represented by a representative of their choosing, where in a single member electorate up to 49% of the electorate would be disenfranchised.

Whilst there is ongoing urgent need for review of the City’s electoral system, its external boundaries and the election of the Lord Mayor and Deputy Lord Mayor – the recommendations proposed in the final report should be supported.

Commission recommends increase in City Representation

The Victorian Electoral Commission has recommended in its final report that the level of representation of the City of Melbourne be increased from 9 to 11 Councillors – 2 City wide Councillors plus the Lord Mayor and Deputy Lord Mayor team)

The Commission failed to address concerns related to the method of election of the Lord Mayor and Deputy Lord Mayor and the City’s external boundaries and voter franchise.The Commissions report also failed to address concerns in relation to the above the line voting, calculation of the surplus transfer value and count-back process used in fulfilling casual vacancies. The terms of reference of the Commission review prevented it from addressing the real issues effecting the City Council.

Putting the limitations of the review aside the recommendation to increase the level of representation and maintain a city wide electorate is a positive for Melbourne. A ward system based on geographical boundaries would have divided the city and communities of interest.


The Council votes as a whole and should be elected as a whole.

The geographical size of the Council is not too large (Similar in size to a State or Federal electorate).

Under the system of proportional representation, in spite concerns about the serious flaws in the way votes are counted and issues pertaining to the voter franchise – the City wide multi-member electorate is the most democratic.

An increase from seven to nine members elected city wide would ensure on average that 95% of the electorate would be represented by a representative of their choosing, where in a single member electorate up to 49% of the electorate would be disenfranchised.

Whilst there is ongoing urgent need for review of the City’s electoral system, its external boundaries and the election of the Lord Mayor and Deputy Lord Mayor – the recommendations proposed in the final report should be supported.