Gambling on the outcome

Poker machines and Australia’s addiction to gambling has dominated talks between Tasmania Independent elect Andrew Wilkie and the want-a-be leaders Julia Gillard and Tony Abbott.

Andrew Wilkie’s concern about Australia’s addition to gambling is not isolated and he joins fellow South Australian independent Senator Nick Xenophon in trying to curb the impact of gaming and the State governments addition to the gaming dollar.

One solution that has not yet been widely canvases is the proposal to have all gaming in Australia to be via a registered electronic gaming card similar to a debit card, removing the cash economy and providing a means of monitoring and limiting problems associated with gambling.

The Commonwealth Government can introduce a gaming card through its national financial and banking powers.

A gaming card can be issued only on production of photo ID a passport and or Tax file number. One card per person.

Problem gamblers could have limits placed on their betting habits or even denied access to an account. An electronic gaming card would also prevent the misue use of gaming as a means of laundering money.

Gaming cards could be issued by a central gaming authority database at licenced establishments.

Gambling on the outcome

Poker machines and Australia’s addiction to gambling has dominated talks between Tasmania Independent elect Andrew Wilkie and the want-a-be leaders Julia Gillard and Tony Abbott.

Andrew Wilkie’s concern about Australia’s addition to gambling is not isolated and he joins fellow South Australian independent Senator Nick Xenophon in trying to curb the impact of gaming and the State governments addition to the gaming dollar.

One solution that has not yet been widely canvases is the proposal to have all gaming in Australia to be via a registered electronic gaming card similar to a debit card, removing the cash economy and providing a means of monitoring and limiting problems associated with gambling.

The Commonwealth Government can introduce a gaming card through its national financial and banking powers.

A gaming card can be issued only on production of photo ID a passport and or Tax file number. One card per person.

Problem gamblers could have limits placed on their betting habits or even denied access to an account. An electronic gaming card would also prevent the misue use of gaming as a means of laundering money.

Gaming cards could be issued by a central gaming authority database at licenced establishments.

Gambling on the outcome

Poker machines and Australia’s addiction to gambling has dominated talks between Tasmania Independent elect Andrew Wilkie and the want-a-be leaders Julia Gillard and Tony Abbott.

Andrew Wilkie’s concern about Australia’s addition to gambling is not isolated and he joins fellow South Australian independent Senator Nick Xenophon in trying to curb the impact of gaming and the State governments addition to the gaming dollar.

One solution that has not yet been widely canvases is the proposal to have all gaming in Australia to be via a registered electronic gaming card similar to a debit card, removing the cash economy and providing a means of monitoring and limiting problems associated with gambling.

The Commonwealth Government can introduce a gaming card through its national financial and banking powers.

A gaming card can be issued only on production of photo ID a passport and or Tax file number. One card per person.

Problem gamblers could have limits placed on their betting habits or even denied access to an account. An electronic gaming card would also prevent the misue use of gaming as a means of laundering money.

Gaming cards could be issued by a central gaming authority database at licenced establishments.

Greening Melbourne

The results of the Melbourne Federal Election has raised the bar in the forthcoming State election with the seats of Melbourne, Richmond and Brunswick up for grabs.

Analysis of the results show that both Labor and the Liberal Party lost votes to the Greens. The Greens “Its time” “This time I will vote Green” campaign hit its mark.

35% was impressive and beyond expectations. What was also of interest was that the Liberal vote declined from 24% down to 19% indicating that the Liberal party may have played dead in the campaign. Other parties also experienced a drop in their vote

Informal votes (19%) , Sex Party (1.8%*), Family First (43%) and the Greens (58%) all produced an increase (Expressed as a percentage *Sex Party a first time entrant).

At the same time the Liberal Party (-15%), ALP (-20%) and the Democrats (-58%) all experienced a decline in support. The Democrats as a percentage of their support being the greatest loser.

Much of the unexpected win was without any doubt a pox on both your houses. The tell tale sign being the low turnout which at present is 20% below expectation.


First Preferences
Polling Places Returned: 42 of 49 Enrolment: 102,879 Turnout: 70.72%
Candidate Party Votes % Swing (%)
PEARSON, Georgia Family First 1,005 1.43 +0.43
BANDT, Adam Australian Greens 25,387 36.10 +13.30
MURRAY, Joel Australian Sex Party 1,244 1.77 +1.77
COLLYER, David Australian Democrats 419 0.60 -0.83
GREEN, Penelope Secular Party of Australia 470 0.67 +0.67
BOWTELL, Cath Australian Labor Party 27,771 39.49 -10.02
OLSEN, Simon Liberal 14,030 19.95 -3.54
…… Citizens Electoral Council of Australia 0 0.00 -0.67
…… Socialist Equality Party 0 0.00 -0.48
…… Other 0 0.00 -0.62
FORMAL 70,326 96.66 -0.54
INFORMAL 2,428 3.34 +0.54
TOTAL 72,754 70.72 -20.78

Two Candidate Preferred
Polling Places Returned: 42 of 49 Turnout: 70.72%
Candidate Party Votes This Election (%) Last Election (%) Swing (%)
BANDT, Adam Australian Greens 39,172 55.70 45.29 +10.41
BOWTELL, Cath Australian Labor Party 31,154 44.30 54.71 -10.41

Greening Melbourne

The results of the Melbourne Federal Election has raised the bar in the forthcoming State election with the seats of Melbourne, Richmond and Brunswick up for grabs.

Analysis of the results show that both Labor and the Liberal Party lost votes to the Greens. The Greens “Its time” “This time I will vote Green” campaign hit its mark.

35% was impressive and beyond expectations. What was also of interest was that the Liberal vote declined from 24% down to 19% indicating that the Liberal party may have played dead in the campaign. Other parties also experienced a drop in their vote

Informal votes (19%) , Sex Party (1.8%*), Family First (43%) and the Greens (58%) all produced an increase (Expressed as a percentage *Sex Party a first time entrant).

At the same time the Liberal Party (-15%), ALP (-20%) and the Democrats (-58%) all experienced a decline in support. The Democrats as a percentage of their support being the greatest loser.

Much of the unexpected win was without any doubt a pox on both your houses. The tell tale sign being the low turnout which at present is 20% below expectation.


First Preferences
Polling Places Returned: 42 of 49 Enrolment: 102,879 Turnout: 70.72%
Candidate Party Votes % Swing (%)
PEARSON, Georgia Family First 1,005 1.43 +0.43
BANDT, Adam Australian Greens 25,387 36.10 +13.30
MURRAY, Joel Australian Sex Party 1,244 1.77 +1.77
COLLYER, David Australian Democrats 419 0.60 -0.83
GREEN, Penelope Secular Party of Australia 470 0.67 +0.67
BOWTELL, Cath Australian Labor Party 27,771 39.49 -10.02
OLSEN, Simon Liberal 14,030 19.95 -3.54
…… Citizens Electoral Council of Australia 0 0.00 -0.67
…… Socialist Equality Party 0 0.00 -0.48
…… Other 0 0.00 -0.62
FORMAL 70,326 96.66 -0.54
INFORMAL 2,428 3.34 +0.54
TOTAL 72,754 70.72 -20.78

Two Candidate Preferred
Polling Places Returned: 42 of 49 Turnout: 70.72%
Candidate Party Votes This Election (%) Last Election (%) Swing (%)
BANDT, Adam Australian Greens 39,172 55.70 45.29 +10.41
BOWTELL, Cath Australian Labor Party 31,154 44.30 54.71 -10.41

Greening Melbourne

The results of the Melbourne Federal Election has raised the bar in the forthcoming State election with the seats of Melbourne, Richmond and Brunswick up for grabs.

Analysis of the results show that both Labor and the Liberal Party lost votes to the Greens. The Greens “Its time” “This time I will vote Green” campaign hit its mark.

35% was impressive and beyond expectations. What was also of interest was that the Liberal vote declined from 24% down to 19% indicating that the Liberal party may have played dead in the campaign. Other parties also experienced a drop in their vote

Informal votes (19%) , Sex Party (1.8%*), Family First (43%) and the Greens (58%) all produced an increase (Expressed as a percentage *Sex Party a first time entrant).

At the same time the Liberal Party (-15%), ALP (-20%) and the Democrats (-58%) all experienced a decline in support. The Democrats as a percentage of their support being the greatest loser.

Much of the unexpected win was without any doubt a pox on both your houses. The tell tale sign being the low turnout which at present is 20% below expectation.


First Preferences
Polling Places Returned: 42 of 49 Enrolment: 102,879 Turnout: 70.72%
Candidate Party Votes % Swing (%)
PEARSON, Georgia Family First 1,005 1.43 +0.43
BANDT, Adam Australian Greens 25,387 36.10 +13.30
MURRAY, Joel Australian Sex Party 1,244 1.77 +1.77
COLLYER, David Australian Democrats 419 0.60 -0.83
GREEN, Penelope Secular Party of Australia 470 0.67 +0.67
BOWTELL, Cath Australian Labor Party 27,771 39.49 -10.02
OLSEN, Simon Liberal 14,030 19.95 -3.54
…… Citizens Electoral Council of Australia 0 0.00 -0.67
…… Socialist Equality Party 0 0.00 -0.48
…… Other 0 0.00 -0.62
FORMAL 70,326 96.66 -0.54
INFORMAL 2,428 3.34 +0.54
TOTAL 72,754 70.72 -20.78

Two Candidate Preferred
Polling Places Returned: 42 of 49 Turnout: 70.72%
Candidate Party Votes This Election (%) Last Election (%) Swing (%)
BANDT, Adam Australian Greens 39,172 55.70 45.29 +10.41
BOWTELL, Cath Australian Labor Party 31,154 44.30 54.71 -10.41

Sussex Street Sucks: Political Knifes poised to strike.

The night of the long knives. There are many within the Victorian ALP that have set their sights on Sussex Street and the poor performance of the ALP CHQ (Campaign headquarters).

CHQ is criticized for running a disastrous campaign. They are the ones that tried to stage manage the event to the point where they placed the re-election of the ALP in the situation they now find themselves in. CHQ, based in Sydney, has steered the Federal election towards the rocks and the forthcoming shipwreck of the NSW State >abor Party. They should not have been allowed to manage the campaign.

As long as there is chance that the ALP can form a minority government the knives waiting CHQ and the NSW right will remain clenched tight behind backs waiting for the first strike.

Given the extent of the outcome Julia Gillard may be well advised to go into opposition and bide her time and start her campain for election from day one. She will only have to wait 18 months before the fragile coalition begins to crumble and a double dissolution is called.

Sussex Street Sucks: Political Knifes poised to strike.

The night of the long knives. There are many within the Victorian ALP that have set their sights on Sussex Street and the poor performance of the ALP CHQ (Campaign headquarters).

CHQ is criticized for running a disastrous campaign. They are the ones that tried to stage manage the event to the point where they placed the re-election of the ALP in the situation they now find themselves in. CHQ, based in Sydney, has steered the Federal election towards the rocks and the forthcoming shipwreck of the NSW State >abor Party. They should not have been allowed to manage the campaign.

As long as there is chance that the ALP can form a minority government the knives waiting CHQ and the NSW right will remain clenched tight behind backs waiting for the first strike.

Given the extent of the outcome Julia Gillard may be well advised to go into opposition and bide her time and start her campain for election from day one. She will only have to wait 18 months before the fragile coalition begins to crumble and a double dissolution is called.

Hung Parliament: Decision to be made on the floor of the house

Julia Gillard has managed to hold on to what is a cliff hanger of an election. Neither the incumbent or the opposition leader can claim a win.

Convention has it that the incumbent prime-minister/government remains in office until the Governor General is advised otherwise. It could be that Julia calls for decision to be tested in the floor of the house with a vote of confidence in the government.

Questions to be considered by the Independents. Which Party held the majority of votes national wide and just as important which party contributed to the independents election.

Whilst the ALP has lost its majority the Liberal Party has also failed to secure a majority.

Odds are Australia will be going back to the polls if not within three months within the next 18 months.

The newly elected Senate will not take office until July 2011. We can expect that the next election will also be held on the back of a double dissolution no matter which party forms government.

Hung Parliament: Decision to be made on the floor of the house

Julia Gillard has managed to hold on to what is a cliff hanger of an election. Neither the incumbent or the opposition leader can claim a win.

Convention has it that the incumbent prime-minister/government remains in office until the Governor General is advised otherwise. It could be that Julia calls for decision to be tested in the floor of the house with a vote of confidence in the government.

Questions to be considered by the Independents. Which Party held the majority of votes national wide and just as important which party contributed to the independents election.

Whilst the ALP has lost its majority the Liberal Party has also failed to secure a majority.

Odds are Australia will be going back to the polls if not within three months within the next 18 months.

The newly elected Senate will not take office until July 2011. We can expect that the next election will also be held on the back of a double dissolution no matter which party forms government.