Melbourne’s Most Travelled Revelled We provide the statistical summary breakdown that the Council tries to avoid to disclose

We have compiled and dissected Melbourne Travel Register to produce the most recent compilation of Melbourne City Council’s Travel register.  the Information that thew Council does not want you to know.
 
CITY OF MELBOURNE
OVERSEAS AND INTERSTATE TRAVEL                 
1 December 2004 to 30 June 2007
The most travelled and biggest spenders in order of Total costs
(Above $10,000)
Name Total Cost No of Days No of Trips  Average Cost/Day 
Scott Chapman $59,564.53 69 12  $   863.25
Geoff Lawler $58,113.77 56 10  $1,037.75
David Pitchford $48,718.51 61 16  $   798.66
John So  $45,171.05 43 11  $1,050.49
Gary Singer $36,563.46 26 4  $1,406.29
Kevin Louey $26,915.66 28 7  $   961.27
Peter Chaffey $26,458.52 28 3  $   944.95
Jane Sharwood $24,689.19 34 5  $   726.15
Michael Anderson $21,827.00 16 1  $1,364.19
Fiona Snedden $19,623.65 25 4  $   784.95
Kristy Taylor $18,249.28 13 2  $1,403.79
Brian Shanahan $17,901.76 32 4  $   559.43
Edgar Dong $15,200.00 32 2  $   475.00
Carl Jetter $14,873.86 22 2  $   676.08
Mark Drew $13,489.18 14 2  $   963.51
Tom Parker $12,740.81 56 5  $   227.51
Trudy McPhee $11,170.12 33 2  $   338.49
 
CITY OF MELBOURNE
OVERSEAS AND INTERSTATE TRAVEL
1 December 2004 to 30 June 2007
The most travelled and biggest spenders in order of number of days spent away from Melbourne
(More then 20)
Name Total Cost No of Days No of Trips  Average Cost/Day 
Scott Chapman $59,564.53 69 12  $   863.25
David Pitchford $48,718.51 61 16  $   798.66
Geoff Lawler $58,113.77 56 10  $1,037.75
Tom Parker $12,740.81 56 5  $   227.51
Shane Power $7,322.73 55 6  $   133.14
John So  $45,171.05 43 11  $1,050.49
Graeme Porteous $1,670.35 38 2  $     43.96
Francis Khoo $3,759.24 35 2  $   107.41
Jane Sharwood $24,689.19 34 5  $   726.15
Trudy McPhee $11,170.12 33 2  $   338.49
Brian Shanahan $17,901.76 32 4  $   559.43
Edgar Dong $15,200.00 32 2  $   475.00
Murat Sezer $2,837.39 29 1  $     97.84
Kuang Lee $1,337.39 29 1  $     46.12
Kevin Louey $26,915.66 28 7  $   961.27
Peter Chaffey $26,458.52 28 3  $   944.95
Sue Beal $1,467.96 28 1  $     52.43
Gary Singer $36,563.46 26 4  $1,406.29
Fiona Snedden $19,623.65 25 4  $   784.95
Carl Jetter $14,873.86 22 2  $   676.08
Simon Spain $4,820.22 22 6  $   219.10
Steven Richardson $3,495.13 22 3  $   158.87
Shears $1,591.37 22 1  $     72.34
 
CITY OF MELBOURNE
OVERSEAS AND INTERSTATE TRAVEL
1 December 2004 to 30 June 2007
The most travelled and biggest spenders in order of number fo trips taken (More then 4)
Name Total Cost No of Days No of Trips  Average Cost/Day 
David Pitchford $48,718.51 61 16  $   798.66
Scott Chapman $59,564.53 69 12  $   863.25
John So  $45,171.05 43 11  $1,050.49
Geoff Lawler $58,113.77 56 10  $1,037.75
Bill Keon $6,644.34 15 8  $   442.96
Kevin Louey $26,915.66 28 7  $   961.27
Shane Power $7,322.73 55 6  $   133.14
Simon Spain $4,820.22 22 6  $   219.10
Rob Adams  $6,086.14 15 6  $   405.74
Tom Parker $12,740.81 56 5  $   227.51
Jane Sharwood $24,689.19 34 5  $   726.15
Brian Shanahan $17,901.76 32 4  $   559.43
Gary Singer $36,563.46 26 4  $1,406.29
Fiona Snedden $19,623.65 25 4  $   784.95
Nancy Di Santo $4,349.80 11 4  $   395.44
Michael Norton $3,189.94 6 4  $   531.66
Ian Harris $1,813.38 6 4  $   302.23
 
CITY OF MELBOURNE OVERSEAS AND INTERSTATE TRAVEL                    1 December 2004 to 30 June 2007
The most travelled and biggest spenders in order of average cost per day (More then $500 per day)
Name Total Cost No of Days No of Trips  Average Cost/Day 
Gary Singer $36,563.46 26 4  $1,406.29
Kristy Taylor $18,249.28 13 2  $1,403.79
Michael Anderson $21,827.00 16 1  $1,364.19
Hayden Cock $5,294.68 5 2  $1,058.94
John So  $45,171.05 43 11  $1,050.49
Mark Jones $3,121.38 3 1  $1,040.46
Keith Williamson $4,155.56 4 1  $1,038.89
Geoff Lawler $58,113.77 56 10  $1,037.75
Mike Dawson-Smith $5,930.41 6 2  $   988.40
Mark Drew $13,489.18 14 2  $   963.51
Kevin Louey $26,915.66 28 7  $   961.27
Peter Chaffey $26,458.52 28 3  $   944.95
Cecilia $2,735.48 3 1  $   911.83
Scott Chapman $59,564.53 69 12  $   863.25
David Pitchford $48,718.51 61 16  $   798.66
Catherine Ng $787.14 1 1  $   787.14
Fiona Snedden $19,623.65 25 4  $   784.95
Nalika Peiris $1,557.00 2 1  $   778.50
Holly Shorland $1,478.00 2 1  $   739.00
Bev Murray $2,938.79 4 1  $   734.70
Jane Sharwood $24,689.19 34 5  $   726.15
Linda Weatherson $7,876.90 11 3  $   716.08
Tasia Karlis $1,420.18 2 1  $   710.09
Terry Makings $3,458.72 5 3  $   691.74
Fraser Brindley $3,446.92 5 1  $   689.38
Robyn Leeson $6,193.22 9 1  $   688.14
Geoff Robinson $1,370.33 2 2  $   685.17
David Hassett $2,043.42 3 2  $   681.14
Steven Bebend $2,036.84 3 1  $   678.95
Carl Jetter $14,873.86 22 2  $   676.08
Martin Paten $4,604.00 7 1  $   657.71
Ian Rowan $4,602.01 7 2  $   657.43
Sandro Meloni $3,820.51 6 1  $   636.75
Bob Rosen $4,455.80 7 2  $   636.54
John Kanelopoulos $1,269.08 2 1  $   634.54
David Wilson $3,164.12 5 2  $   632.82
Michelle Coffey $1,855.82 3 1  $   618.61
Hok Sie $1,843.20 3 1  $   614.40
Andrew Korr $1,785.36 3 1  $   595.12
Lyn Wainwright $1,728.03 3 1  $   576.01
Brian Shanahan $17,901.76 32 4  $   559.43
Roger Berriman $557.83 1 1  $   557.83
Russ Wood $4,980.00 9 2  $   553.33
Ron Nelson $1,104.46 2 1  $   552.23
Trudie Balthazaar $5,399.79 10 3  $   539.98
Mark Cochrane-Holly $534.80 1 1  $   534.80
Paula Kilpatrick $1,603.63 3 1  $   534.54
Anthony McIntosh $2,664.86 5 1  $   532.97
Darren Comi $1,596.00 3 1  $   532.00
Michael Norton $3,189.94 6 4  $   531.66
Cherry Grimwade $7,755.45 15 1  $   517.03
Adrian Ong $511.80 1 1  $   511.80
Richard Frost $508.17 1 1  $   508.17
Linda Bee $1,518.44 3 1  $   506.15

Melbourne’s Most Travelled Revelled We provide the statistical summary breakdown that the Council tries to avoid to disclose

We have compiled and dissected Melbourne Travel Register to produce the most recent compilation of Melbourne City Council’s Travel register.  the Information that thew Council does not want you to know.
 
CITY OF MELBOURNE
OVERSEAS AND INTERSTATE TRAVEL                 
1 December 2004 to 30 June 2007
The most travelled and biggest spenders in order of Total costs
(Above $10,000)
Name Total Cost No of Days No of Trips  Average Cost/Day 
Scott Chapman $59,564.53 69 12  $   863.25
Geoff Lawler $58,113.77 56 10  $1,037.75
David Pitchford $48,718.51 61 16  $   798.66
John So  $45,171.05 43 11  $1,050.49
Gary Singer $36,563.46 26 4  $1,406.29
Kevin Louey $26,915.66 28 7  $   961.27
Peter Chaffey $26,458.52 28 3  $   944.95
Jane Sharwood $24,689.19 34 5  $   726.15
Michael Anderson $21,827.00 16 1  $1,364.19
Fiona Snedden $19,623.65 25 4  $   784.95
Kristy Taylor $18,249.28 13 2  $1,403.79
Brian Shanahan $17,901.76 32 4  $   559.43
Edgar Dong $15,200.00 32 2  $   475.00
Carl Jetter $14,873.86 22 2  $   676.08
Mark Drew $13,489.18 14 2  $   963.51
Tom Parker $12,740.81 56 5  $   227.51
Trudy McPhee $11,170.12 33 2  $   338.49
 
CITY OF MELBOURNE
OVERSEAS AND INTERSTATE TRAVEL
1 December 2004 to 30 June 2007
The most travelled and biggest spenders in order of number of days spent away from Melbourne
(More then 20)
Name Total Cost No of Days No of Trips  Average Cost/Day 
Scott Chapman $59,564.53 69 12  $   863.25
David Pitchford $48,718.51 61 16  $   798.66
Geoff Lawler $58,113.77 56 10  $1,037.75
Tom Parker $12,740.81 56 5  $   227.51
Shane Power $7,322.73 55 6  $   133.14
John So  $45,171.05 43 11  $1,050.49
Graeme Porteous $1,670.35 38 2  $     43.96
Francis Khoo $3,759.24 35 2  $   107.41
Jane Sharwood $24,689.19 34 5  $   726.15
Trudy McPhee $11,170.12 33 2  $   338.49
Brian Shanahan $17,901.76 32 4  $   559.43
Edgar Dong $15,200.00 32 2  $   475.00
Murat Sezer $2,837.39 29 1  $     97.84
Kuang Lee $1,337.39 29 1  $     46.12
Kevin Louey $26,915.66 28 7  $   961.27
Peter Chaffey $26,458.52 28 3  $   944.95
Sue Beal $1,467.96 28 1  $     52.43
Gary Singer $36,563.46 26 4  $1,406.29
Fiona Snedden $19,623.65 25 4  $   784.95
Carl Jetter $14,873.86 22 2  $   676.08
Simon Spain $4,820.22 22 6  $   219.10
Steven Richardson $3,495.13 22 3  $   158.87
Shears $1,591.37 22 1  $     72.34
 
CITY OF MELBOURNE
OVERSEAS AND INTERSTATE TRAVEL
1 December 2004 to 30 June 2007
The most travelled and biggest spenders in order of number fo trips taken (More then 4)
Name Total Cost No of Days No of Trips  Average Cost/Day 
David Pitchford $48,718.51 61 16  $   798.66
Scott Chapman $59,564.53 69 12  $   863.25
John So  $45,171.05 43 11  $1,050.49
Geoff Lawler $58,113.77 56 10  $1,037.75
Bill Keon $6,644.34 15 8  $   442.96
Kevin Louey $26,915.66 28 7  $   961.27
Shane Power $7,322.73 55 6  $   133.14
Simon Spain $4,820.22 22 6  $   219.10
Rob Adams  $6,086.14 15 6  $   405.74
Tom Parker $12,740.81 56 5  $   227.51
Jane Sharwood $24,689.19 34 5  $   726.15
Brian Shanahan $17,901.76 32 4  $   559.43
Gary Singer $36,563.46 26 4  $1,406.29
Fiona Snedden $19,623.65 25 4  $   784.95
Nancy Di Santo $4,349.80 11 4  $   395.44
Michael Norton $3,189.94 6 4  $   531.66
Ian Harris $1,813.38 6 4  $   302.23
 
CITY OF MELBOURNE OVERSEAS AND INTERSTATE TRAVEL                    1 December 2004 to 30 June 2007
The most travelled and biggest spenders in order of average cost per day (More then $500 per day)
Name Total Cost No of Days No of Trips  Average Cost/Day 
Gary Singer $36,563.46 26 4  $1,406.29
Kristy Taylor $18,249.28 13 2  $1,403.79
Michael Anderson $21,827.00 16 1  $1,364.19
Hayden Cock $5,294.68 5 2  $1,058.94
John So  $45,171.05 43 11  $1,050.49
Mark Jones $3,121.38 3 1  $1,040.46
Keith Williamson $4,155.56 4 1  $1,038.89
Geoff Lawler $58,113.77 56 10  $1,037.75
Mike Dawson-Smith $5,930.41 6 2  $   988.40
Mark Drew $13,489.18 14 2  $   963.51
Kevin Louey $26,915.66 28 7  $   961.27
Peter Chaffey $26,458.52 28 3  $   944.95
Cecilia $2,735.48 3 1  $   911.83
Scott Chapman $59,564.53 69 12  $   863.25
David Pitchford $48,718.51 61 16  $   798.66
Catherine Ng $787.14 1 1  $   787.14
Fiona Snedden $19,623.65 25 4  $   784.95
Nalika Peiris $1,557.00 2 1  $   778.50
Holly Shorland $1,478.00 2 1  $   739.00
Bev Murray $2,938.79 4 1  $   734.70
Jane Sharwood $24,689.19 34 5  $   726.15
Linda Weatherson $7,876.90 11 3  $   716.08
Tasia Karlis $1,420.18 2 1  $   710.09
Terry Makings $3,458.72 5 3  $   691.74
Fraser Brindley $3,446.92 5 1  $   689.38
Robyn Leeson $6,193.22 9 1  $   688.14
Geoff Robinson $1,370.33 2 2  $   685.17
David Hassett $2,043.42 3 2  $   681.14
Steven Bebend $2,036.84 3 1  $   678.95
Carl Jetter $14,873.86 22 2  $   676.08
Martin Paten $4,604.00 7 1  $   657.71
Ian Rowan $4,602.01 7 2  $   657.43
Sandro Meloni $3,820.51 6 1  $   636.75
Bob Rosen $4,455.80 7 2  $   636.54
John Kanelopoulos $1,269.08 2 1  $   634.54
David Wilson $3,164.12 5 2  $   632.82
Michelle Coffey $1,855.82 3 1  $   618.61
Hok Sie $1,843.20 3 1  $   614.40
Andrew Korr $1,785.36 3 1  $   595.12
Lyn Wainwright $1,728.03 3 1  $   576.01
Brian Shanahan $17,901.76 32 4  $   559.43
Roger Berriman $557.83 1 1  $   557.83
Russ Wood $4,980.00 9 2  $   553.33
Ron Nelson $1,104.46 2 1  $   552.23
Trudie Balthazaar $5,399.79 10 3  $   539.98
Mark Cochrane-Holly $534.80 1 1  $   534.80
Paula Kilpatrick $1,603.63 3 1  $   534.54
Anthony McIntosh $2,664.86 5 1  $   532.97
Darren Comi $1,596.00 3 1  $   532.00
Michael Norton $3,189.94 6 4  $   531.66
Cherry Grimwade $7,755.45 15 1  $   517.03
Adrian Ong $511.80 1 1  $   511.80
Richard Frost $508.17 1 1  $   508.17
Linda Bee $1,518.44 3 1  $   506.15

Melbourne’s Most Travelled Revelled We provide the statistical summary breakdown that the Council tries to avoid to disclose

We have compiled and dissected Melbourne Travel Register to produce the most recent compilation of Melbourne City Council’s Travel register.  the Information that thew Council does not want you to know.
 
CITY OF MELBOURNE
OVERSEAS AND INTERSTATE TRAVEL                 
1 December 2004 to 30 June 2007
The most travelled and biggest spenders in order of Total costs
(Above $10,000)
Name Total Cost No of Days No of Trips  Average Cost/Day 
Scott Chapman $59,564.53 69 12  $   863.25
Geoff Lawler $58,113.77 56 10  $1,037.75
David Pitchford $48,718.51 61 16  $   798.66
John So  $45,171.05 43 11  $1,050.49
Gary Singer $36,563.46 26 4  $1,406.29
Kevin Louey $26,915.66 28 7  $   961.27
Peter Chaffey $26,458.52 28 3  $   944.95
Jane Sharwood $24,689.19 34 5  $   726.15
Michael Anderson $21,827.00 16 1  $1,364.19
Fiona Snedden $19,623.65 25 4  $   784.95
Kristy Taylor $18,249.28 13 2  $1,403.79
Brian Shanahan $17,901.76 32 4  $   559.43
Edgar Dong $15,200.00 32 2  $   475.00
Carl Jetter $14,873.86 22 2  $   676.08
Mark Drew $13,489.18 14 2  $   963.51
Tom Parker $12,740.81 56 5  $   227.51
Trudy McPhee $11,170.12 33 2  $   338.49
 
CITY OF MELBOURNE
OVERSEAS AND INTERSTATE TRAVEL
1 December 2004 to 30 June 2007
The most travelled and biggest spenders in order of number of days spent away from Melbourne
(More then 20)
Name Total Cost No of Days No of Trips  Average Cost/Day 
Scott Chapman $59,564.53 69 12  $   863.25
David Pitchford $48,718.51 61 16  $   798.66
Geoff Lawler $58,113.77 56 10  $1,037.75
Tom Parker $12,740.81 56 5  $   227.51
Shane Power $7,322.73 55 6  $   133.14
John So  $45,171.05 43 11  $1,050.49
Graeme Porteous $1,670.35 38 2  $     43.96
Francis Khoo $3,759.24 35 2  $   107.41
Jane Sharwood $24,689.19 34 5  $   726.15
Trudy McPhee $11,170.12 33 2  $   338.49
Brian Shanahan $17,901.76 32 4  $   559.43
Edgar Dong $15,200.00 32 2  $   475.00
Murat Sezer $2,837.39 29 1  $     97.84
Kuang Lee $1,337.39 29 1  $     46.12
Kevin Louey $26,915.66 28 7  $   961.27
Peter Chaffey $26,458.52 28 3  $   944.95
Sue Beal $1,467.96 28 1  $     52.43
Gary Singer $36,563.46 26 4  $1,406.29
Fiona Snedden $19,623.65 25 4  $   784.95
Carl Jetter $14,873.86 22 2  $   676.08
Simon Spain $4,820.22 22 6  $   219.10
Steven Richardson $3,495.13 22 3  $   158.87
Shears $1,591.37 22 1  $     72.34
 
CITY OF MELBOURNE
OVERSEAS AND INTERSTATE TRAVEL
1 December 2004 to 30 June 2007
The most travelled and biggest spenders in order of number fo trips taken (More then 4)
Name Total Cost No of Days No of Trips  Average Cost/Day 
David Pitchford $48,718.51 61 16  $   798.66
Scott Chapman $59,564.53 69 12  $   863.25
John So  $45,171.05 43 11  $1,050.49
Geoff Lawler $58,113.77 56 10  $1,037.75
Bill Keon $6,644.34 15 8  $   442.96
Kevin Louey $26,915.66 28 7  $   961.27
Shane Power $7,322.73 55 6  $   133.14
Simon Spain $4,820.22 22 6  $   219.10
Rob Adams  $6,086.14 15 6  $   405.74
Tom Parker $12,740.81 56 5  $   227.51
Jane Sharwood $24,689.19 34 5  $   726.15
Brian Shanahan $17,901.76 32 4  $   559.43
Gary Singer $36,563.46 26 4  $1,406.29
Fiona Snedden $19,623.65 25 4  $   784.95
Nancy Di Santo $4,349.80 11 4  $   395.44
Michael Norton $3,189.94 6 4  $   531.66
Ian Harris $1,813.38 6 4  $   302.23
 
CITY OF MELBOURNE OVERSEAS AND INTERSTATE TRAVEL                    1 December 2004 to 30 June 2007
The most travelled and biggest spenders in order of average cost per day (More then $500 per day)
Name Total Cost No of Days No of Trips  Average Cost/Day 
Gary Singer $36,563.46 26 4  $1,406.29
Kristy Taylor $18,249.28 13 2  $1,403.79
Michael Anderson $21,827.00 16 1  $1,364.19
Hayden Cock $5,294.68 5 2  $1,058.94
John So  $45,171.05 43 11  $1,050.49
Mark Jones $3,121.38 3 1  $1,040.46
Keith Williamson $4,155.56 4 1  $1,038.89
Geoff Lawler $58,113.77 56 10  $1,037.75
Mike Dawson-Smith $5,930.41 6 2  $   988.40
Mark Drew $13,489.18 14 2  $   963.51
Kevin Louey $26,915.66 28 7  $   961.27
Peter Chaffey $26,458.52 28 3  $   944.95
Cecilia $2,735.48 3 1  $   911.83
Scott Chapman $59,564.53 69 12  $   863.25
David Pitchford $48,718.51 61 16  $   798.66
Catherine Ng $787.14 1 1  $   787.14
Fiona Snedden $19,623.65 25 4  $   784.95
Nalika Peiris $1,557.00 2 1  $   778.50
Holly Shorland $1,478.00 2 1  $   739.00
Bev Murray $2,938.79 4 1  $   734.70
Jane Sharwood $24,689.19 34 5  $   726.15
Linda Weatherson $7,876.90 11 3  $   716.08
Tasia Karlis $1,420.18 2 1  $   710.09
Terry Makings $3,458.72 5 3  $   691.74
Fraser Brindley $3,446.92 5 1  $   689.38
Robyn Leeson $6,193.22 9 1  $   688.14
Geoff Robinson $1,370.33 2 2  $   685.17
David Hassett $2,043.42 3 2  $   681.14
Steven Bebend $2,036.84 3 1  $   678.95
Carl Jetter $14,873.86 22 2  $   676.08
Martin Paten $4,604.00 7 1  $   657.71
Ian Rowan $4,602.01 7 2  $   657.43
Sandro Meloni $3,820.51 6 1  $   636.75
Bob Rosen $4,455.80 7 2  $   636.54
John Kanelopoulos $1,269.08 2 1  $   634.54
David Wilson $3,164.12 5 2  $   632.82
Michelle Coffey $1,855.82 3 1  $   618.61
Hok Sie $1,843.20 3 1  $   614.40
Andrew Korr $1,785.36 3 1  $   595.12
Lyn Wainwright $1,728.03 3 1  $   576.01
Brian Shanahan $17,901.76 32 4  $   559.43
Roger Berriman $557.83 1 1  $   557.83
Russ Wood $4,980.00 9 2  $   553.33
Ron Nelson $1,104.46 2 1  $   552.23
Trudie Balthazaar $5,399.79 10 3  $   539.98
Mark Cochrane-Holly $534.80 1 1  $   534.80
Paula Kilpatrick $1,603.63 3 1  $   534.54
Anthony McIntosh $2,664.86 5 1  $   532.97
Darren Comi $1,596.00 3 1  $   532.00
Michael Norton $3,189.94 6 4  $   531.66
Cherry Grimwade $7,755.45 15 1  $   517.03
Adrian Ong $511.80 1 1  $   511.80
Richard Frost $508.17 1 1  $   508.17
Linda Bee $1,518.44 3 1  $   506.15

Adding Up the Expenses Council continues to avoid publication of full costs

The Age today has reported on the Melbourne City Councils published expense statements for the previous financial quarter.

It needs to be noted that the published expenses do not represent a true and correct account of Council expenses still missing are expenses related to the Lord Mayor and deputy Lord Mayor’s limousines, the cost of internal catering and inbound and outbound missions.

The City Council, in a policy that has the Council auditors cringing with amazement that only Auditors of Enron can agree, the City Council only published costs that have been “acquitted”, i.e. it is not a disclosed cost until all the documents have been received and acquitted.

In all fairness the auditors did not sign off on this policy statement advocated by Linda Weatherson, former Governance Officer. The fact remains it is a cost to the council, acquitted or not once a debit has been made. The question remains why are these costs not being reports and to what extent. We hope to tabulate the latest costs and present a cost to date for the current council including a summary report of the Council’s Travel Register which always shows up some inconsistencies in the Council’s published expense statements, what ever the excuse the Council administration try to offer.

Notation: the City of Melbourne has removed the publication of the January 2005 to June 2006 Travel Register data. Why we can only guess that the Council administration will go to any length to avoid disclosure and accountability. The ravel register is a public document and should remain published and accessible on the Council’s web site for the duration of at least two-terms of the City Council. With the accessibility of then Internet there is no need for this information to be removed from public view or right of open scrutiny. We have requested that the City of Melbourne republish the missing data.

Note: Missing from the above consolidated expenses is the local travel costs associated with the Lord Mayor and Deputy Lord Mayor estimated at around $250,000 per year. The lord Mayor and deputy Lord Mayor have the unlimited use of a Council Car, free petrol, free maintenance and free car-parking. Full costs hidden from public view. In addition costs related to internal catering, free booze are also not shown, although the City Council maintains an account of these expenses they will not readily disclose the full costs. WHY?

More detailed statistics available here http://melbcity.topcities.com/mcc01.htm

Council adds up cost of travel
Clay Lucas, The Age July 28, 2007

EXPENSE figures released yesterday by the cash-strapped Melbourne City Council, which in May sacked 26 staff to cut costs, show it spent $280,000 on interstate and international travel in the last financial year.

The council is expected to sack more staff next month as part of further cost-cutting.

Yesterday’s figures also showed the council paid $10,379 in the last financial year on petrol and eTag charges for the low-profile councillor Carl Jetter to drive from his home in Ashwood to the Town Hall, even though he works full-time in his private business from an office next door.

Cr Jetter, the council’s marketing chairman and part of Lord Mayor John So’s Living Melbourne team, is sales director for Australia-China Connections, the journal of the Australian China Business Council.

He works daily selling ads in the magazine from his Collins Street office next door to Town Hall.

Cr Jetter, who in 2005 visited Tianjin, China, on a council-funded trip, also parks his car in a council-provided car park in Little Collins Street.

Yesterday he defended spending public money to get to his private workplace, saying he was legally entitled to claim local travel expenses when visiting the Town Hall for council-related work.

“I am just spending what I am entitled to,” he said.

Councillor travel expenses released yesterday also included $12,000 for Cr So to represent Melbourne on trips to Milan, Thessaloniki and New York.

In total, the nine Melbourne City councillors spent $49,348 on interstate and international travel in the last financial year.

Adding Up the Expenses Council continues to avoid publication of full costs

The Age today has reported on the Melbourne City Councils published expense statements for the previous financial quarter.

It needs to be noted that the published expenses do not represent a true and correct account of Council expenses still missing are expenses related to the Lord Mayor and deputy Lord Mayor’s limousines, the cost of internal catering and inbound and outbound missions.

The City Council, in a policy that has the Council auditors cringing with amazement that only Auditors of Enron can agree, the City Council only published costs that have been “acquitted”, i.e. it is not a disclosed cost until all the documents have been received and acquitted.

In all fairness the auditors did not sign off on this policy statement advocated by Linda Weatherson, former Governance Officer. The fact remains it is a cost to the council, acquitted or not once a debit has been made. The question remains why are these costs not being reports and to what extent. We hope to tabulate the latest costs and present a cost to date for the current council including a summary report of the Council’s Travel Register which always shows up some inconsistencies in the Council’s published expense statements, what ever the excuse the Council administration try to offer.

Notation: the City of Melbourne has removed the publication of the January 2005 to June 2006 Travel Register data. Why we can only guess that the Council administration will go to any length to avoid disclosure and accountability. The ravel register is a public document and should remain published and accessible on the Council’s web site for the duration of at least two-terms of the City Council. With the accessibility of then Internet there is no need for this information to be removed from public view or right of open scrutiny. We have requested that the City of Melbourne republish the missing data.

Note: Missing from the above consolidated expenses is the local travel costs associated with the Lord Mayor and Deputy Lord Mayor estimated at around $250,000 per year. The lord Mayor and deputy Lord Mayor have the unlimited use of a Council Car, free petrol, free maintenance and free car-parking. Full costs hidden from public view. In addition costs related to internal catering, free booze are also not shown, although the City Council maintains an account of these expenses they will not readily disclose the full costs. WHY?

More detailed statistics available here http://melbcity.topcities.com/mcc01.htm

Council adds up cost of travel
Clay Lucas, The Age July 28, 2007

EXPENSE figures released yesterday by the cash-strapped Melbourne City Council, which in May sacked 26 staff to cut costs, show it spent $280,000 on interstate and international travel in the last financial year.

The council is expected to sack more staff next month as part of further cost-cutting.

Yesterday’s figures also showed the council paid $10,379 in the last financial year on petrol and eTag charges for the low-profile councillor Carl Jetter to drive from his home in Ashwood to the Town Hall, even though he works full-time in his private business from an office next door.

Cr Jetter, the council’s marketing chairman and part of Lord Mayor John So’s Living Melbourne team, is sales director for Australia-China Connections, the journal of the Australian China Business Council.

He works daily selling ads in the magazine from his Collins Street office next door to Town Hall.

Cr Jetter, who in 2005 visited Tianjin, China, on a council-funded trip, also parks his car in a council-provided car park in Little Collins Street.

Yesterday he defended spending public money to get to his private workplace, saying he was legally entitled to claim local travel expenses when visiting the Town Hall for council-related work.

“I am just spending what I am entitled to,” he said.

Councillor travel expenses released yesterday also included $12,000 for Cr So to represent Melbourne on trips to Milan, Thessaloniki and New York.

In total, the nine Melbourne City councillors spent $49,348 on interstate and international travel in the last financial year.

Adding Up the Expenses Council continues to avoid publication of full costs

The Age today has reported on the Melbourne City Councils published expense statements for the previous financial quarter.

It needs to be noted that the published expenses do not represent a true and correct account of Council expenses still missing are expenses related to the Lord Mayor and deputy Lord Mayor’s limousines, the cost of internal catering and inbound and outbound missions.

The City Council, in a policy that has the Council auditors cringing with amazement that only Auditors of Enron can agree, the City Council only published costs that have been “acquitted”, i.e. it is not a disclosed cost until all the documents have been received and acquitted.

In all fairness the auditors did not sign off on this policy statement advocated by Linda Weatherson, former Governance Officer. The fact remains it is a cost to the council, acquitted or not once a debit has been made. The question remains why are these costs not being reports and to what extent. We hope to tabulate the latest costs and present a cost to date for the current council including a summary report of the Council’s Travel Register which always shows up some inconsistencies in the Council’s published expense statements, what ever the excuse the Council administration try to offer.

Notation: the City of Melbourne has removed the publication of the January 2005 to June 2006 Travel Register data. Why we can only guess that the Council administration will go to any length to avoid disclosure and accountability. The ravel register is a public document and should remain published and accessible on the Council’s web site for the duration of at least two-terms of the City Council. With the accessibility of then Internet there is no need for this information to be removed from public view or right of open scrutiny. We have requested that the City of Melbourne republish the missing data.

Note: Missing from the above consolidated expenses is the local travel costs associated with the Lord Mayor and Deputy Lord Mayor estimated at around $250,000 per year. The lord Mayor and deputy Lord Mayor have the unlimited use of a Council Car, free petrol, free maintenance and free car-parking. Full costs hidden from public view. In addition costs related to internal catering, free booze are also not shown, although the City Council maintains an account of these expenses they will not readily disclose the full costs. WHY?

More detailed statistics available here http://melbcity.topcities.com/mcc01.htm

Council adds up cost of travel
Clay Lucas, The Age July 28, 2007

EXPENSE figures released yesterday by the cash-strapped Melbourne City Council, which in May sacked 26 staff to cut costs, show it spent $280,000 on interstate and international travel in the last financial year.

The council is expected to sack more staff next month as part of further cost-cutting.

Yesterday’s figures also showed the council paid $10,379 in the last financial year on petrol and eTag charges for the low-profile councillor Carl Jetter to drive from his home in Ashwood to the Town Hall, even though he works full-time in his private business from an office next door.

Cr Jetter, the council’s marketing chairman and part of Lord Mayor John So’s Living Melbourne team, is sales director for Australia-China Connections, the journal of the Australian China Business Council.

He works daily selling ads in the magazine from his Collins Street office next door to Town Hall.

Cr Jetter, who in 2005 visited Tianjin, China, on a council-funded trip, also parks his car in a council-provided car park in Little Collins Street.

Yesterday he defended spending public money to get to his private workplace, saying he was legally entitled to claim local travel expenses when visiting the Town Hall for council-related work.

“I am just spending what I am entitled to,” he said.

Councillor travel expenses released yesterday also included $12,000 for Cr So to represent Melbourne on trips to Milan, Thessaloniki and New York.

In total, the nine Melbourne City councillors spent $49,348 on interstate and international travel in the last financial year.

Snedden halt to models career When morals gets in the way of fashion but lends a hand in self-promotion

Melbourne City Councillor, Fiona Snedden, has pulled the plug on teen model’s fashion career – the reason she is only 15. Cr Sneden considers she is morally bound to object to the girl who was chosen to be the face of Melbourne fashion week to strut the cat walk.

The fashion industry is a tough business and when mixed with petty politics it becomes even tougher.

Teen model, Claire Quirk, who turn 16 on the day of the Melbourne Spring Fashion Festival had her parent’s approval who also accompanied her on assignments as she pursued a career in modelling.

Cr Sneden claims that as a mother she has the right to veto the choice of the Fashion festival selectors and organisers and decide what is best.

At 15 a person can legally leave school and take up employment as a waitress, nurse or trades person apprentice. Even childhood performance stars, as we saw every week on the Young Talent Team a TV series that sparked multi-million dollar careers at a younger age can take up show business career but not it appears in the modelling industry according to Cr Sneden.

Undoubtedly Cr Sneden thought of the influence it would have on other young teenagers of Clair’s age. I wonder if she thought about the moral dilemma and effect on young children when she was pulled over for being over the limit?




Teen dumped as face of fashion week

Claire Quirk (left): Her fashion festival gala appearance cancelled
because she's only 15.

Claire Quirk (left): Her fashion festival gala appearance cancelled because she’s only 15.
Photo: Mario Borg

July 17, 2007

Melbourne City Council has dumped the face of its coming Melbourne Spring Fashion Week because of her age.

Fifteen-year-old Claire Quirk was to be crowned “the face” of the fashion week, and appear on catwalks at many of the festival’s 142 events.

Ms Quirk, a year 11 student accompanied to all public appearances by her parents or a chaperone, turns 16 on the day she was to tread the catwalk at the opening gala of the festival, which runs from September 3 to 9.

But Cr Fiona Sneden, who chairs the council’s business committee, objected to the selection choice of such a young girl by the Melbourne City Council’s marketing officers.

“As a parent, I have a fundamental issue about this,” she said. “Fifteen is just too young. There needs to be a time when we stop and say, ‘Is it wrong to have models this young?’, doesn’t there?”

The council’s move follows the British fashion industry panel’s Model Health Inquiry, which last week recommended banning models aged under 16 from London Fashion Week.

The British report called for a scientific study into the prevalence of eating disorders among fashion models, and an investigation into whether a minimum body-mass index requirement should be introduced for London Fashion Week models, a measure already adopted by Madrid fashion week.

Australia’s main fashion industry body supported the restrictions on models younger than 16 working at big fashion shows, saying younger teenagers were ill-equipped to face issues such as sexualisation, alcohol and rejection.

Australian Fashion Council manager Zoe Edquist said yesterday that Melbourne’s fashion festivals were “adult environments”, and that younger teenage models must be chaperoned.

Ms Edquist, whose organisation represents more than 200 fashion businesses, said: “Children under the age of 16 – and they are really children – are in a very adult industry. It’s not an adult industry in the way the pornography industry is adult, but it is a grown-up environment.”

If the environment was properly controlled, there was not a problem, Ms Edquist said. Once children were older than 16, they would be able to handle themselves. “I think 16 is the age of consent, but I think it’s also generally considered an age when young people are able to handle themselves in a grown-up environment.”

Cr Snedden, who has a seven-year-old daughter, also objected to having such a young face as the figurehead of the festival because it was “the wrong demographic” to attract shoppers to Melbourne.

“The demographic we are pitching to is a young, savvy gen X and gen Y demographic, and to women who are my age,” said Cr Snedden, 51.

Ms Quirk and her parents yesterday declined to speak to The Age about Melbourne Spring Fashion Week.

But her agency, Chadwick Models, said she would have made an excellent face of the festival.

“We don’t want her to be singled out as the model that was dumped as the face of Melbourne Spring Fashion Week because she was too young,” Chadwick model booker Lyli Estalote said.

“She is almost 16, but we understand the conservativeness of society.”

Ms Quirk until recently lived in Singapore with her parents, Ms Estalote said. “She was probably Singapore’s most photographed model.”

Snedden halt to models career When morals gets in the way of fashion but lends a hand in self-promotion

Melbourne City Councillor, Fiona Snedden, has pulled the plug on teen model’s fashion career – the reason she is only 15. Cr Sneden considers she is morally bound to object to the girl who was chosen to be the face of Melbourne fashion week to strut the cat walk.

The fashion industry is a tough business and when mixed with petty politics it becomes even tougher.

Teen model, Claire Quirk, who turn 16 on the day of the Melbourne Spring Fashion Festival had her parent’s approval who also accompanied her on assignments as she pursued a career in modelling.

Cr Sneden claims that as a mother she has the right to veto the choice of the Fashion festival selectors and organisers and decide what is best.

At 15 a person can legally leave school and take up employment as a waitress, nurse or trades person apprentice. Even childhood performance stars, as we saw every week on the Young Talent Team a TV series that sparked multi-million dollar careers at a younger age can take up show business career but not it appears in the modelling industry according to Cr Sneden.

Undoubtedly Cr Sneden thought of the influence it would have on other young teenagers of Clair’s age. I wonder if she thought about the moral dilemma and effect on young children when she was pulled over for being over the limit?




Teen dumped as face of fashion week

Claire Quirk (left): Her fashion festival gala appearance cancelled
because she's only 15.

Claire Quirk (left): Her fashion festival gala appearance cancelled because she’s only 15.
Photo: Mario Borg

July 17, 2007

Melbourne City Council has dumped the face of its coming Melbourne Spring Fashion Week because of her age.

Fifteen-year-old Claire Quirk was to be crowned “the face” of the fashion week, and appear on catwalks at many of the festival’s 142 events.

Ms Quirk, a year 11 student accompanied to all public appearances by her parents or a chaperone, turns 16 on the day she was to tread the catwalk at the opening gala of the festival, which runs from September 3 to 9.

But Cr Fiona Sneden, who chairs the council’s business committee, objected to the selection choice of such a young girl by the Melbourne City Council’s marketing officers.

“As a parent, I have a fundamental issue about this,” she said. “Fifteen is just too young. There needs to be a time when we stop and say, ‘Is it wrong to have models this young?’, doesn’t there?”

The council’s move follows the British fashion industry panel’s Model Health Inquiry, which last week recommended banning models aged under 16 from London Fashion Week.

The British report called for a scientific study into the prevalence of eating disorders among fashion models, and an investigation into whether a minimum body-mass index requirement should be introduced for London Fashion Week models, a measure already adopted by Madrid fashion week.

Australia’s main fashion industry body supported the restrictions on models younger than 16 working at big fashion shows, saying younger teenagers were ill-equipped to face issues such as sexualisation, alcohol and rejection.

Australian Fashion Council manager Zoe Edquist said yesterday that Melbourne’s fashion festivals were “adult environments”, and that younger teenage models must be chaperoned.

Ms Edquist, whose organisation represents more than 200 fashion businesses, said: “Children under the age of 16 – and they are really children – are in a very adult industry. It’s not an adult industry in the way the pornography industry is adult, but it is a grown-up environment.”

If the environment was properly controlled, there was not a problem, Ms Edquist said. Once children were older than 16, they would be able to handle themselves. “I think 16 is the age of consent, but I think it’s also generally considered an age when young people are able to handle themselves in a grown-up environment.”

Cr Snedden, who has a seven-year-old daughter, also objected to having such a young face as the figurehead of the festival because it was “the wrong demographic” to attract shoppers to Melbourne.

“The demographic we are pitching to is a young, savvy gen X and gen Y demographic, and to women who are my age,” said Cr Snedden, 51.

Ms Quirk and her parents yesterday declined to speak to The Age about Melbourne Spring Fashion Week.

But her agency, Chadwick Models, said she would have made an excellent face of the festival.

“We don’t want her to be singled out as the model that was dumped as the face of Melbourne Spring Fashion Week because she was too young,” Chadwick model booker Lyli Estalote said.

“She is almost 16, but we understand the conservativeness of society.”

Ms Quirk until recently lived in Singapore with her parents, Ms Estalote said. “She was probably Singapore’s most photographed model.”

Snedden halt to models career When morals gets in the way of fashion but lends a hand in self-promotion

Melbourne City Councillor, Fiona Snedden, has pulled the plug on teen model’s fashion career – the reason she is only 15. Cr Sneden considers she is morally bound to object to the girl who was chosen to be the face of Melbourne fashion week to strut the cat walk.

The fashion industry is a tough business and when mixed with petty politics it becomes even tougher.

Teen model, Claire Quirk, who turn 16 on the day of the Melbourne Spring Fashion Festival had her parent’s approval who also accompanied her on assignments as she pursued a career in modelling.

Cr Sneden claims that as a mother she has the right to veto the choice of the Fashion festival selectors and organisers and decide what is best.

At 15 a person can legally leave school and take up employment as a waitress, nurse or trades person apprentice. Even childhood performance stars, as we saw every week on the Young Talent Team a TV series that sparked multi-million dollar careers at a younger age can take up show business career but not it appears in the modelling industry according to Cr Sneden.

Undoubtedly Cr Sneden thought of the influence it would have on other young teenagers of Clair’s age. I wonder if she thought about the moral dilemma and effect on young children when she was pulled over for being over the limit?




Teen dumped as face of fashion week

Claire Quirk (left): Her fashion festival gala appearance cancelled
because she's only 15.

Claire Quirk (left): Her fashion festival gala appearance cancelled because she’s only 15.
Photo: Mario Borg

July 17, 2007

Melbourne City Council has dumped the face of its coming Melbourne Spring Fashion Week because of her age.

Fifteen-year-old Claire Quirk was to be crowned “the face” of the fashion week, and appear on catwalks at many of the festival’s 142 events.

Ms Quirk, a year 11 student accompanied to all public appearances by her parents or a chaperone, turns 16 on the day she was to tread the catwalk at the opening gala of the festival, which runs from September 3 to 9.

But Cr Fiona Sneden, who chairs the council’s business committee, objected to the selection choice of such a young girl by the Melbourne City Council’s marketing officers.

“As a parent, I have a fundamental issue about this,” she said. “Fifteen is just too young. There needs to be a time when we stop and say, ‘Is it wrong to have models this young?’, doesn’t there?”

The council’s move follows the British fashion industry panel’s Model Health Inquiry, which last week recommended banning models aged under 16 from London Fashion Week.

The British report called for a scientific study into the prevalence of eating disorders among fashion models, and an investigation into whether a minimum body-mass index requirement should be introduced for London Fashion Week models, a measure already adopted by Madrid fashion week.

Australia’s main fashion industry body supported the restrictions on models younger than 16 working at big fashion shows, saying younger teenagers were ill-equipped to face issues such as sexualisation, alcohol and rejection.

Australian Fashion Council manager Zoe Edquist said yesterday that Melbourne’s fashion festivals were “adult environments”, and that younger teenage models must be chaperoned.

Ms Edquist, whose organisation represents more than 200 fashion businesses, said: “Children under the age of 16 – and they are really children – are in a very adult industry. It’s not an adult industry in the way the pornography industry is adult, but it is a grown-up environment.”

If the environment was properly controlled, there was not a problem, Ms Edquist said. Once children were older than 16, they would be able to handle themselves. “I think 16 is the age of consent, but I think it’s also generally considered an age when young people are able to handle themselves in a grown-up environment.”

Cr Snedden, who has a seven-year-old daughter, also objected to having such a young face as the figurehead of the festival because it was “the wrong demographic” to attract shoppers to Melbourne.

“The demographic we are pitching to is a young, savvy gen X and gen Y demographic, and to women who are my age,” said Cr Snedden, 51.

Ms Quirk and her parents yesterday declined to speak to The Age about Melbourne Spring Fashion Week.

But her agency, Chadwick Models, said she would have made an excellent face of the festival.

“We don’t want her to be singled out as the model that was dumped as the face of Melbourne Spring Fashion Week because she was too young,” Chadwick model booker Lyli Estalote said.

“She is almost 16, but we understand the conservativeness of society.”

Ms Quirk until recently lived in Singapore with her parents, Ms Estalote said. “She was probably Singapore’s most photographed model.”

Lord Mayor Missing in Action

John So has not had a good month.

John first came under criticism following the release of the Ernst and Young efficiency report which found that John So was heading the Council towards bankruptcy and they seriously criticised his lack of good financial governance.

The report also unearthed another hidden layer of corruption in the Council’s governance/administration which uses the BBC “Yes Minister” series as a “good governance guide in how to deceive the public (when is a cost not a cost – when it has not yet been acquitted – Good one Heather – lol how you managed to sell that to the Council auditors we never know but your sales pitch of deception did not win over your audience with that punch line).

Then came the motion of no-confidence in which John So avoided losing by using his casting vote. Both the Financial Review and the herald Sun have done a “expose on the Lord Mayor” which was not favourable.

Now the Age has weighed into the So hunt with this article by Clay Lucas.

So criticised for missing meetings
Clay Lucas, The Age, July 17, 2007

LORD Mayor John So has attended less than a third of Melbourne City Council meetings held in the past 18 months.

Cr So, who is on a salary of $110,000, has attended only 21 meetings out of a total of 76 held since January 2006. He attended 17 of the 18 full meetings of council, but only four committee meetings.

Fellow councillors said it was not good enough for the Lord Mayor to have missed so many council meetings.

“If councillors are not prepared to participate in democratic processes, then maybe they should step aside,” said Cr Peter Clarke, a constant critic.

Cr Clarke and several others on the council believe that by operating this way Cr So dodges the responsibility for unpopular decisions — made initially at committee meetings and then ratified at full council meetings.

But the Lord Mayor argues that he does a more effective job by sending his deputy, Gary Singer, in his place to the council’s committee meetings.

“I chair council meetings and my deputy represents the leadership team at committee meetings,” Cr So said last night. His deputy, Cr Singer, attended 57 out of the 76 meetings held. “The job isn’t just attending meetings,” Cr Singer said.

The councillor with the worst attendance record was Catherine Ng, the chair of planning at the council, attending 42 meetings in the past 18 months.